308 optic question




Kinoons

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#21
How much of a difference will different loads make? Are we talking inches or 1/8’s of an inch?
Depends on the manufacture. If it’s reportedly match ammo I wouldn’t expect more than an inch. (My own WAG without anything to back it up) Range fodder can vary by an inch to several within the same batch of ammo, so a different lot could have a different bullet, different powder, who knows.
 
#22
How much of a difference will different loads make? Are we talking inches or 1/8’s of an inch?
It's not that big a deal. Get yourself a ballistics app like Ballistic AE or shooter. Ammo velocity isn't going to vary so much that you won't be on paper. Don't sweat the small stuff. Just go get some trigger time and have fun.
 

LongRange

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#23
How much of a difference will different loads make? Are we talking inches or 1/8’s of an inch?
as kinoons said it depends on the ammo and what your idea of accuracy is as well as a few other things...ive seen hornady 6.5 creed 140ELDM ammo with a 40fps ES and ive seen hornady white tail 6.5 creed 140 BTHP with a 65fps ES bang a 14" steel plate at 850yds pretty consistently but would not shoot under about 3/4" at 100yds...take the same guns and same ammo out to 1085yds and they had a tuff time hitting a 17"plate.

ive also seen a custom built 6.5 creed shoot hornady 140ELDM ammo 1/2" or better at 100yds and shoot 6"-7" groups at 1085 with a 35fps ES.
if you dont have the time or money to load the match ammo is pretty good now days but if you want better more consistent ammo your going to have to load....if your new-ish to shooting then like roach said get some trigger time and dont worry so much about small groups right now.
 
#24
as kinoons said it depends on the ammo and what your idea of accuracy is as well as a few other things...ive seen hornady 6.5 creed 140ELDM ammo with a 40fps ES and ive seen hornady white tail 6.5 creed 140 BTHP with a 65fps ES bang a 14" steel plate at 850yds pretty consistently but would not shoot under about 3/4" at 100yds...take the same guns and same ammo out to 1085yds and they had a tuff time hitting a 17"plate.

ive also seen a custom built 6.5 creed shoot hornady 140ELDM ammo 1/2" or better at 100yds and shoot 6"-7" groups at 1085 with a 35fps ES.
if you dont have the time or money to load the match ammo is pretty good now days but if you want better more consistent ammo your going to have to load....if your new-ish to shooting then like roach said get some trigger time and dont worry so much about small groups right now.
Thanks for the info. Definitely not new to shooting and understand the importance of trigger time. New to long range and precision which is a different beast to learn. Hope to get out to CC this weekend to sight in at 100.

The reason I asked is because I have a lot of 308 that I’d like to use and ultimately see myself trying to hit steel at distance not paper. Wanted to see if I could burn through all of that first.
 

Kinoons

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#25
Thanks for the info. Definitely not new to shooting and understand the importance of trigger time. New to long range and precision which is a different beast to learn. Hope to get out to CC this weekend to sight in at 100.

The reason I asked is because I have a lot of 308 that I’d like to use and ultimately see myself trying to hit steel at distance not paper. Wanted to see if I could burn through all of that first.
I have a mixed bucket of .308 myself. At 100-300 or so yards shooting large steel (18-24”) it doesn’t matter. Past that it may come into play

For example I have a British enfield no4T. I have surplus ammo from two manufactures. At 500 yards one hits on and the other misses low by about a foot or so.

It you stick to a single manufacture even with range fodder ball you should be close enough for 2-3 MOA steel accuracy out to several hundred (600?) yards. Factory match ammo should be good out to 800+ to 1-2 MOA.
 

LongRange

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#26
Thanks for the info. Definitely not new to shooting and understand the importance of trigger time. New to long range and precision which is a different beast to learn. Hope to get out to CC this weekend to sight in at 100.

The reason I asked is because I have a lot of 308 that I’d like to use and ultimately see myself trying to hit steel at distance not paper. Wanted to see if I could burn through all of that first.
burning up all that extra ammo is the perfect place to start shooting steel at distance no sense just shooting it at 100 or into a bank...setup some steel and start shooting...get use to trying to spot your own impacts and making corrections ect...a 60 fps difference in velocity at 1000yds is about 10" so you should have no problem bangin steel out to 5-600yds.
 
#30
Well that was both fun and painful at the same time. Guess I needed it boresighted cause after 9 rounds of nothing on the paper I reset the scope completely. Took me about 9 more to get it in the general vicinity of the center ring and about another 9 to get it where I feel it’s centered. The fact that over the next 18 rounds I was high and low was likely all me. My groups were nice and tight. Love the trigger pull and how unexpected the bang is.

The scope kind of tripped me up cause on the turrets I would have expected up/down and left/right to be the exact way I need to move the turret to get the bullet impact to move accordingly, however I found I had to move the turret in the down direction to ge this impact to go up, and had a similar experience with the windage.

I need to focus on a solid setup (I understand the need for a monopod or bag now), and breathing. Cant wait to get out and play again soon.
 
#31
I always find it easier to get on target (steel) at 300-400 than 100 yard paper when sighting in. It's far easier to see the bullet splash. Don't confuse point of impact with reticle movement.
 
#33
Dialing "up" moves the point of impact up. Forget about reticle movement, it only complicates matters. If you do not adjust your point of aim ( adjust cross hairs to your intended POI) after dialing, either up or down, then what you experienced is correct. Yes dialing up moves the crosshairs down but your point of impact is higher as it will always be. You need to reposition after dialing elevation. Like I said ignore crosshairs movement and just remember up is always up.

ETA: I could be completely wrong lol so verify with someone else
 

Kinoons

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#34
Dialing "up" moves the point of impact up. Forget about reticle movement, it only complicates matters. If you do not adjust your point of aim ( adjust cross hairs to your intended POI) after dialing, either up or down, then what you experienced is correct. Yes dialing up moves the crosshairs down but your point of impact is higher as it will always be. You need to reposition after dialing elevation. Like I said ignore crosshairs movement and just remember up is always up.

ETA: I could be completely wrong lol so verify with someone else
Yeah it was my understanding that on the overwhelming majority of modern scopes the clicks move the impact of the round in the selected direction.
 
#38
That wasn’t my experience I’m going to try to call Vortex this week.
There is nothing wrong with your scope you are simply focusing on reticle movement. Don't do that. I guarantee that if you're an inch low at 100 yards and you dial up 1 MOA / ~3/10ths of a mil you will impact where you expect to.

your scope is stationary you're really moving the barrel up when you dial in elevation.
 

GunButler

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#39
In my experience, I have found that if I use an SAE (say 3/32) Allen wrench to install the optic...If my point of impact needs to be raised, I turn the wrench to "UP" However If I used a 3mm allen wrench to install the optic, and my point of impact needs t o be raised... I go the opposit of "up"