A tale of Two Wheel Guns.... Ruger Vs. S&W Customer Service

#21
Not just there frames, parts are cast as well. I am not a metallurgist and don't know the particulars of Rugers cast parts or S&W MIM parts in my book cast is cast and I prefer a solid forged part. but I don't think there is a high failure rate for cast/MIM parts if there is I haven't heard of it. The parts are so precise you don't need to fit each part as you did with forged parts. Problem with S&W is minor things that could and should be fixed such as getting barrels clocked correctly, knocking the high/sharp areas off of the cast parts. A little quality control would help a bunch but of course you only here about the problems nobody says a word when there gun is perfect.
 
#22
My Ruger armorers school was at the Pine Tree casting factory in New Port, N.H.
I got to watch the workers make parts using what is called LOST WAX PROCESS.
A die is made to the specs for the part that is needed. The die is injected with a plastic and the parts are attached to trees that would remind you of model kits.
The trees are dipped in a mix called ceramic slurry and several coats are applied.
After the slurry has dried moulton metal is poured in melting the plastic out,that is why the process is called lost wax.
the completed parts are left to cool and then the ceramic slurry is removed with
vibratory hammers.
The finished product is the same as the original part, does not require machining.
I was advised that the Pine Tree factory did a great deal of outside the firearms industry casting, the lost wax process is especially good for odd shaped parts like impellers for pumps.
 

Dr. Marneaus

Station Wagon Collector
#23
You had a bad experience I get it and you have been harping about it ever
since. Now you know why the older Smith's command the prices they do. Enjoy your Ruger's if your happy with them I am happy for you. I am not going to defend S&W's new guns or there lack of quality control. If you guys want to go back to the days of hand fitting every part by skilled craftsman you would be looking at $2500.00 revolvers. MIM parts and assemblers are what they had to do to stay competitive in today's marketplace. They figured out its cheaper to have a gun returned then reject it in the factory. I really don't understand why its a big deal there are about 3 guys left on this forum that are into revolvers the rest of ya are into plastic semi's seems like the old school wheel guys got ran off a while back for voicing there unpopular opinions.
bigtubby?

My comments here are simply about CUSTOMER SERVICE. Both firearms had issues, the way those issues were handled, and the time frame in which they were handled, are what is being illustrated here.

The bottom line is that both firearms had one or more issue, that, in my mind, is perfectly acceptable. People (companies) screw up, its what happens thereafter that is important to me, and in this case, it is precisely what has sworn me off of any new smith and wessons.

This particular thread isnt even about product quality, its about service.
 

Mike Searson

Μολὼν λάβ
#24
Wow, that's kinda odd. Did you get a look at the firearm before he sent it?
Yeah...there were problems with cylinder lockup. I assumed the prior owner was flicking it open and closed while watching gladiator movies.

I saw nothing wrong with the bbl aside from a few external superficial scratches and no problems with the hammer.
 

Glocksterpaulie

The Perfectionist
Forum Supporter
#25
This is the reason I will continue to buy older firearms. You don’t have to be a rocket scientist to see and feel the difference in today’s firearms compared to years ago. Look at an older Remington 870/1100 compared to today, the ones today look like a ten year old cut them out of a 2x8 piece of pine.

The wood and steel they use today is crap. QC is also crap in a lot of firearm manufacturers today.

Paulie
 

Gullwing

1911 pistolsmith
Staff member
Moderator
#26
This is the reason I will continue to buy older firearms. You don’t have to be a rocket scientist to see and feel the difference in today’s firearms compared to years ago. Look at an older Remington 870/1100 compared to today, the ones today look like a ten year old cut them out of a 2x8 piece of pine.

The wood and steel they use today is crap. QC is also crap in a lot of firearm manufacturers today.

Paulie
I have an older Walther P38 for sale... :devil:
 
#27
I agree on there having been a drop in quality control with firearms made in the last 10 years or so, I worked in a gun shop during Obama's tenure and with all the panic buying and all the sales numbers driven up during his time in office, I believe the gun manufacturers were turning out firearms as fast as they could to keep up with demand and to make as much money as possible during the uptick in panic buying... I believe more than anything those factors play a bigger role in poor quality control than anything else... I have seen this happen to many products during times of high demand, I hope and believe, now that the buying panic is down, a little at least, people will start looking at what they are buying and demanding quality over quantity and will start to put their money into better products, gun manufacturers will have to start cleaning up their game if they want to get the all powerful consumer dollar, add to that all the people who were buying firearms during the panic days who had never owned or purchased one before, their lack of knowledge of what a quality gun is and the fact they have probably not even fired one before and possible since.