Basic reloading

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NYECOGunsmith

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#21
In the old days, we used to try every possible projectile, from every manufacturer and in every weight. We kept lists of what worked and what didn't. We did this because at any given time, the supply of the "perfect" bullet might suddenly dry up, or the manufacturer might discontinue it because the demand had been so small, or whatever.
So we would drop back to the second most perfect bullet. The real nut jobs :rolleyes:(OK, yes, I am one of the latter) would just order 10,000 of the perfect bullet and not worry too much about them going the way of the do-do, until we got down to only 9,000 left in our stash that is, at which point we would start to panic again.
I told you this was a mental illness!
 

Pachinko Pistola

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#22
In the old days, we used to try every possible projectile, from every manufacturer and in every weight. We kept lists of what worked and what didn't. We did this because at any given time, the supply of the "perfect" bullet might suddenly dry up, or the manufacturer might discontinue it because the demand had been so small, or whatever.
So we would drop back to the second most perfect bullet. The real nut jobs :rolleyes:(OK, yes, I am one of the latter) would just order 10,000 of the perfect bullet and not worry too much about them going the way of the do-do, until we got down to only 9,000 left in our stash that is, at which point we would start to panic again.
I told you this was a mental illness!
:lol: That's some serious cash! I think that many of the Match Kings would be over $3,000. It would be nice to never have to worry about ammo again though :) That's why I bought 2,000 Lake City brass. I heard they last a long time because they're thick. I figured 2,000 would be a lifetime supply of brass since I only shoot about every other week and each case would be reused many times.
 

NYECOGunsmith

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#23
Generally speaking (but not always!) LC brass does have thicker walls. Remember you have to account for this when custom/fine tuning your loads, as the case volume is diminished by the thicker walls, and the pressure curve may be changed, especially if the load gets compressed without your knowing it.

That happens when you have a near full volume load (which is generally, but again, not always, the most efficient loading) and the case capacity is a grain or three less due to the thick walls. You don't notice that the powder is a bit higher up in the case before you seat the bullet, and the load gets compressed. Sometimes good things result from this, sometimes bad things, sometimes (but rarely this one) nothing happens from this.
Best bet is to always keep detailed notes, check every case every time you prep it, again when you actually load it, and don't ever get complacent about reloading. And don't reload when you are tired, distracted, hung over, etc. Dealing with anywhere from 10,000 PSI to 65,000 PSI is risky when all things are perfect. Make a mistake and disaster can be right there with you in a heart beat.
 

Vegas50

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#24
:lol: That's why I bought 2,000 Lake City brass. I heard they last a long time because they're thick. I figured 2,000 would be a lifetime supply of brass since I only shoot about every other week and each case would be reused many times.
Have you tried reloading any LC brass yet? Some of the mil stuff can require extra primer pocket prep. I have a batch of WCC stuff that is a real PITA to prime and has become the donor brass for the 308moor experiment.
 

Pachinko Pistola

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#25
Have you tried reloading any LC brass yet? Some of the mil stuff can require extra primer pocket prep. I have a batch of WCC stuff that is a real PITA to prime and has become the donor brass for the 308moor experiment.
Not yet, but I did order a swager.
 

Pachinko Pistola

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#26
I finished my very first reloads tonight.





38.6 grains of H4895. According to the book it will propel the 168 grain bullet at 2,500fps.

I started in the middle range, to be safe.

The Lake City brass needed some serious resizing and trimming. The machine gun it was fired from had a much bigger chamber than my Remington 700.

Does anybody know why my bullet seater left those rings on the top? I'd rather it didn't do that.

It's been a lot of work, but I'm starting to get the hang of reloading :)
 

Eric cartdork

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#27
Your bullet seater die is grabbing the bullet too tight. Try lubing the bullet till the die breaks in a little bit more. If it still happens even after a couple of hundred lubed rounds, contact the die maker and have them replace it.

I would not load any more match type bullets until that ring disappears. I am not sure if those rings will affect accuracy, but they sure are ugly.
 
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JFComfort

Long Range Shooter
#28
Your bullet seater die is grabbing the bullet too tight. Try lubing the bullet till the die breaks in a little bit more. If it still happens even after a couple of hundred lubed rounds, contact the die maker and have them replace it.

I would not load any more match type bullets until that ring disappears. I am not sure if those rings will affect accuracy, but they sure are ugly.
It won't. The bullet takes more of a beating just getting to the chamber.
 

Pachinko Pistola

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#29
It won't. The bullet takes more of a beating just getting to the chamber.
That's good to know.

I'm going to shoot these at 100 yards today. Next time I resize these cases, I will just do the neck since I only plan to shoot in my R700.

JF, do you know if my SPS Varmint has an adjustable trigger?
 

Eric cartdork

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#30
It won't. The bullet takes more of a beating just getting to the chamber.
The tip does not get abused though. The open match tip will stay the same form until it hits the target.

I do agree with you though in that I don't think it affects accuracy. Only way to tell is too shoot it.

I had these rings before with my new RCBS seating die, and I did not notice any accuracy issue, but I was using surplus 147gr FMJ's and not match bullets. Got about 2 MOA with or without ring.
 

NYECOGunsmith

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#31
Damage to the bullet's tip or nose rarely affects accuracy in a measurable amount, even at at extreme ranges. Damage to the base or heel is a whole 'nother story.

Damage there will induce pitch and yaw and can cause flyers that miss the target or keyhole, both at short range sometimes. The erratic flight starts as the projectile leaves the muzzle, and the damage at the base causes the propelling gases to not give the bullet a final, all around, even push into the atmosphere.
Then the laminar air flow that starts the moment the projectile is in free flight takes over and makes matters worse.

Search the web and you should be able to find some old Aberdeen Proving Ground videos that show the laminar air flow around various projectiles, both perfect and ones that have been damaged or scarred in some manner.

As the projectiles travel through the smoke in the wind tunnel, you can see how the air flows around them, and how it affects their flight characteristics.

You will either find the video's extremely interesting, or an instant cure for insomnia. There doesn't seem to be a middle ground on this one.
 

Pachinko Pistola

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#32
I will search for the video. Sounds interesting. I never took fluid dynamics in college. Don't know much about it.

I just ordered a Chargemaster and chronograph.

Trying to trickle the powder in by hand got a little too annoying, especially when my scale shuts off and needs to be rezeroed while I'm trying to do it!

I'm going to wait until the chrono comes before I fire off this first set of ammo. According to the book it should be 2,500 fps so it will be interesting to see how close it is.

I need to look into what I need to reload .50 AE next. I can't afford the $1.50 each price tag :lol: I have probably 300 .50 AE cases that I've picked up after shooting my factory ammo.
 

Travatron

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#33
Thanks so much, that's a great primer (ha!) on reloading. Looking to get started myself, and had no idea what to look for.
 

JFComfort

Long Range Shooter
#34
That's good to know.

I'm going to shoot these at 100 yards today. Next time I resize these cases, I will just do the neck since I only plan to shoot in my R700.

JF, do you know if my SPS Varmint has an adjustable trigger?
If you have the X-pro mark trigger (or something like that) its adjustable. I'm pretty sure that's the trigger you have.
 

mhudson306

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#36
This was a great introduction. I've been reluctant to get into reloading because of sheer ignorance. This helps get me over the hump. Thanks for taking the time to help folks like me.
 

MrTuna

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#37
I spent $70 for 150 rounds of factory .223 tonight. My dad and I are getting set up for reloading ASAP. Any thoughts on the Dillon Precision reloading machines? I don't mind laying out more cash to make the process easier. I am already spending about $90 a week on factory ammo.
 

Quickdraw

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#38
I spent $70 for 150 rounds of factory .223 tonight. My dad and I are getting set up for reloading ASAP. Any thoughts on the Dillon Precision reloading machines? I don't mind laying out more cash to make the process easier. I am already spending about $90 a week on factory ammo.
I just got my Dillon 650 up and running last week. Already ran a few hundred 223 and 9mm. It is a breeze to crank out quality handloads. I got mine at NFA. They are a Dillon distributor. Put in my order and everything was here in 4 days. Good price too. Give Guido a call he is very experienced with everything Dillon.
 

desertw0lf

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#40
I just got my Dillon 650 up and running last week. Already ran a few hundred 223 and 9mm. It is a breeze to crank out quality handloads. I got mine at NFA. They are a Dillon distributor. Put in my order and everything was here in 4 days. Good price too. Give Guido a call he is very experienced with everything Dillon.
How much did the Dillon 650 cost you from NFA? I am looking at/saving for one online that is $560.