Benchtop Wood Lathe

titanNV

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#1
I need to get a wood lathe for expanding a "ring" cutout inside of 3.5" or so wood disc.

I have had the Central Machinery (Harbor Freight) one on back order for several months. (This is the same as Grizzly and a few others).


I was thinking of using it with Cole Jaws to hold the outside of the wood disc while turning it.

Anyone have experience with wood lathes that could give me any pointers?

I am thinking of jumping ship on the forever back ordered lathe and getting the WEN 3420 instead due to availability:
http://www.wenproducts.com/store/8-Inch-by-12-Inch-Variable-Speed-Benchtop-Wood-Lathe

I do like the variable speed controlled by a knob rather than moving the belt to different pulleys anyway.
 

NYECOGunsmith

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#2
Lots of experience with wood lathes and metal lathes.

And if I understood your project correctly, you have a roughly 3.5 inch wood ring with a hole of some size in the center that needs to be made larger, right?

I can tell you how to do that without a lathe if you like .

With the lathe, you could used heavy duty double sided wood workers tape (a stronger version of double sided carpet tape) and bond it to a sacrificial piece of wood that is screwed to a face plate. Or clamp it to the face plate if it has the slots for that.

Without a lathe, you could tape or clamp it down to a piece of wood, find a hole saw that fits the current hole in the middle of it, put that hole saw in a drill, and center it in the existing hole. Spin the drill enough to start the pilot hole into the backup wood about 1/4" deep or so.

Then change the hole saw for one the size of the hole you need to have in the ring.

Put that larger hole saw's pilot drill bit into the pilot hole you just made, which centers the new, larger saw perfectly on the existing hole, and spin it up, drilling through the ring and into the backup wood.

There ya are, hole is centered and in the new larger size.

Could also be done with a Jig Saw or a Scroll saw using a circle cutting attachment, the sacrificial backup board and a pivot pin installed in the back up board in the center of the existing hole.

Or with Forstner Bits as described for the Hole Saw Method.

If you go with the wood lathe and Cole jaws ( a version of a chuck, for wood lathes) be sure to seat the ring firmly and flat against the radial surface of the chuck so that the hole doesn't end up tapered as it passes through the thickness of the ring.

Could also be done on a metal lathe of sufficient size, I occasionally turn wood on mine, although I have a large wood lathe in the shop as well.
 
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titanNV

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#3
Thanks NYECO
The ring itself is located about 3" from center. I have hundreds to rework over the next year or so.
 

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Tophog

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#4
Could also be done on a metal lathe of sufficient size, I occasionally turn wood on mine, although I have a large wood lathe in the shop as well.
I never noticed your wood lathe. Is it behind the turbo encabulator?
 

Justified

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#5
[MENTION=769]titanNV[/MENTION] I've always wanted to use a lathe so let me know when you get it so I can check it out.
 

NYECOGunsmith

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#6
I never noticed your wood lathe. Is it behind the turbo encabulator?
Parallel to the stairs that go up to the second floor of my shop, big green 1940's Rockwell Delta, weighs as much as a baby elephant, but not as easy to move!

3 phase 3 HP motor on it, 40 inches between centers, about a 14 inch swing. Had 3 of them, gave 2 away when I moved here, kept one for myself, and can't remember ever firing it up since I got here.
 

Idaho Shooter

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#7
Parallel to the stairs that go up to the second floor of my shop, big green 1940's Rockwell Delta, weighs as much as a baby elephant, but not as easy to move!

3 phase 3 HP motor on it, 40 inches between centers, about a 14 inch swing. Had 3 of them, gave 2 away when I moved here, kept one for myself, and can't remember ever firing it up since I got here.
I can come pick it up on the 22nd and clear some room for you.
 

Quickdraw

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#8
I've got a lathe like the one in the picture. I used it for making large (9"-14") fishing plugs. They are fairly simple and work well with the right accessories and tools. Depending on the diameter of your work you might be limited by the measurement of the centerline to the table. I'm not able to measure mine at the moment.
 

NYECOGunsmith

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#9
Thanks NYECO
The ring itself is located about 3" from center. I have hundreds to rework over the next year or so.
Hmm, what exactly is it you want to do to them?

The lathe would probably be the fastest and easiest, but if you were just wanting to increase the width of that circular groove for example, to make the "island" in the center of it smaller, I can see a way to do it pretty fast with a router as well.
 

titanNV

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#10
The "ring" diameter was cut too large on some of them, so I need to take down about 1 mm. A router would work, but I figured the router would be quicker to set uo when doing them by the hundreds.

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LASCHRIS

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#12
Looks like a good way to lose fingers and hand parts. I will leave it's operation to others.
 

Justified

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#13
I have to get a bunch of cool toys to fill that garage!!

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Yeah you do. Look up Peter Brown lathe YouTube. The guy does some interesting lathe work. Sorry back to your question and carry on.
 

NYECOGunsmith

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#14
The "ring" diameter was cut too large on some of them, so I need to take down about 1 mm. A router would work, but I figured the router would be quicker to set uo when doing them by the hundreds.

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Gotta say, reducing the inner diameter by 1 mm in wood is gonna be tricky. In metal, a snap. In wood, if it has to be accurate, sanding to the correct dimension would be the way to go.
 

titanNV

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#15
It would be difficult I think, and time consuming, to sand inside the ring to cut more material out. Shaving off a nominal mm or shouldn't be too bad, I think. A glass bell jar fits in the groove so it can be tested while still in the Cole jaws.
I'm hoping so anyway.

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titanNV

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#16
I should get a better pic so I can be more clear on the objective.

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NYECOGunsmith

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#17
Ah, bell jar cleared up mental image for me.

Problem is, depending on the type of wood, going back into the groove after it has had finish applied may result in tear out.

If that happens, then I would use a sanding stick with the piece spinning on the lathe to widen the groove. I had to do pretty much this exactly, about 20 years ago to help out the trophy shop next door when they got in a couple hundred finished wood bases and crystal bell jars that didn't match, and supplier had closed their doors. Trophy shop got them for a song but didn't find out until too late they didn't match up.

Trophy shop had already accepted a large order for a custom designed trophy with dried flowers that needed to be sealed under the bell jar.

We mounted the base on lathe face plate with clamps, spun it, and held a wood dowel that fit in the groove, and was wrapped with sand paper. Only took a few moments to open the groove up the 1/16" needed, a dab of stain while it spun and it was done.

Tried the first one using freshly sharpened skew gouge, dunno what type of wood it was, but it tore out and splintered, so we used the sanding method.
 

4D5

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#18
I do a lot of woodworking and have number of woodworking tools including a Jet wood lathe 1442.

Some things to consider if you are going to use cole jaws. If you go that route you may run into problems with getting a perfect circle enlarged hole. That approach assumes that the axis of the existing hole and the axis of the outer diameter are coaxial, in other words share the same axis. If they do not, when you turn the inner circle to enlarge you will end up with an oblong hole. This would not be a problem if you were removing a substantial amount of material as the new larger hole axis would be a new true circle centered on the outer diameter axis. However only removing 1mm will prove problematic.

An alternative, albeit more set up work, would be to build an adjustable fixture to hold the work part and a platform with a template with the hole size that you want. Then use a router with a patterning bit to trace the template hole pattern for a perfect circle enlarged hole. This method will still take some futzing to get it right.

This method will give you a perfect circle which would allow the center of the axis of the outer diameter and the axis of the center hole diameter to not be coaxial. Even if they are not coaxial it would be all but imperceptible and you would still end up with a perfect circle.
 

Tophog

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#19
A router with a plunge/press, and a 'Lazy Susan' type setup, with stops or curbs to keep the wood base centered, or a dowel, depending on which the initial groove is concentric with. :smile5:
 
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NYECOGunsmith

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#20
Here's my woodlathe Top, dunno how you missed it, it's big and ugly just like me, only a slightly different shade of green is all!
 
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