Benchtop Wood Lathe

titanNV

NRA Endowment Member
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#21
Well low and behold my Harbor Freight lathe showed up today. Wasn't due until April. Hope to get a chance to set it up this weekend.

This is what the Cole jaw looks like in use. I'm hoping that it won't be too time consuming to take a little off that inside ring.



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4D5

uber Member
#22
Well low and behold my Harbor Freight lathe showed up today. Wasn't due until April. Hope to get a chance to set it up this weekend.

This is what the Cole jaw looks like in use. I'm hoping that it won't be too time consuming to take a little off that inside ring.
When you use it be sure to use the tail stock with a live center for support and a scrap piece to prevent marks on the work piece.
Without that, one small catch and the work piece will be launched :scared:
 

MAC702

LEGEN...wait for it... DARY!
Forum Supporter
#23
... the axis of the existing hole and the axis of the outer diameter are coplanar, in other words share the same axis...
So isn't that coaxial? I don't see coplanar. Maybe I'm picturing it wrongly.

Any two parallel axes would be coplanar.
 
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NYECOGunsmith

Obsessed Member
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#24
Yup, that would be coaxial, not co planar.

And I would try to reduce that inner ring via a "turning cut" if you can get in there, rather than a "facing cut", less chance I think of the skew gouge grabbing the grain and giving you some nasty tear out.
 

4D5

uber Member
#25
MAC702 & NYECOGunsmith
Thanks for catching my error.
Fixed in my post.
Thats what happens when I'm writing about one thing thinking about another :redface:
 

NYECOGunsmith

Obsessed Member
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#27
Coaxial and coplanar. This is some good GD&T. Don’t even see these terms on machinist groups very often. I’m proud.
Now you get to explain geometric dimensioning and tolerancing plus All the symbols that go with it to the non machinists here, I'm not gonna do it again! LOL.
 

Idaho Shooter

Very Active Member
#28
Now you get to explain geometric dimensioning and tolerancing plus All the symbols that go with it to the non machinists here, I'm not gonna do it again! LOL.
If someone wants to learn more of the six degrees of freedom and how that relates to size and form I will answer any question asked. I certainly don’t have time to explain Y14.5 in its entirety. I don’t even think you have that much time.
 

NYECOGunsmith

Obsessed Member
Staff member
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#29
If someone wants to learn more of the six degrees of freedom and how that relates to size and form I will answer any question asked. I certainly don’t have time to explain Y14.5 in its entirety. I don’t even think you have that much time.


Yup, we should both live so long!

I think the 2009 version of the ASME Y14.5 manual is over 220 pages long. Good reading if you have insomnia.