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Best Barrel Metal for Long Range Shooting?





Ron_O

Cave Dweller
#1
I'm trying to figure out the best long range rifle for my 'lifetime' shooting needs. My last big game rifle was a 30-06 that I had for 30 years. Still researching the round I'm going to settle on but it's going to be hard hitting. I likely won't go with a .338 but it'll be something close, possibly a .300 Weatherby Mag or similar.

In looking at the rifle candidates I'm seeing a lot of different types of barrels. I don't plan on doing a massive amount of shooting but want consistency and reliability over the long term.

I'm really trying to figure out the DIFFERENCES, because cold hammered steel, for example, is used in both less expensive as well as very high demand rifles in general. Are one of them consistently better performers than the other?

The options seem to be:

Carbon steel
Cold hammered steel
Stainless steel
Chromalloy
Chrome plated barrel
Heavy steel

There are also fluted barrel options and that seems to be for cooling.

I'm looking for accuracy first. If I go with stainless I'll likely be painting it if it's not already coated because I don't want the bright reflective exposure out in the field.

You guys know better than me. For my purposes is there any real advantage or necessity?

On another level, what about twist rate? I see mostly 1:8 and 1:10 variations.

Thanks for your thoughts!
 

SUBMOA

Harley Builder
#2
My suggestion would be a 300 Win Mag. Hits just as hard as a Weatherby Mag. but the brass is cheaper and easier to get. As far as barrel what are you going to use this rifle for? Is it strictly a hunting rifle, or a week end play rifle, or both?
 

Ron_O

Cave Dweller
#3
My suggestion would be a 300 Win Mag. Hits just as hard as a Weatherby Mag. but the brass is cheaper and easier to get. As far as barrel what are you going to use this rifle for? Is it strictly a hunting rifle, or a week end play rifle, or both?
In reality it'll primarily be used for hunting. I'll probably want to get out for some fun event shoots but even monthly would be a stretch, more like a few times a year.

I'm also looking at the 30-378 as well as the 7mm RUM, still researching overall. I'm really just looking for the flattest shooter with a punch.

It looks like stainless is the way to go.
 

NYECOGunsmith

Obsessed Member
Staff member
Moderator
Forum Supporter
2019 Supporter
#4
The particular alloy of steel used for a barrel has pretty much zero to do with the rifles (potential) accuracy, but has everything to do with how it will stand up to the environments, hot loads, etc. as LONG AS the manufacturing process used to make the barrel is up to the task.

I say that because some alloys are notoriously difficult to work to accurate dimensions and to get crisp details in, and that can of course affect the rifling which in turn can affect accuracy.

If you have an alloy that is "gummy" as a machinist says, then it may be tough with some or all methods of rifling to get good, sharp, well defined lands and grooves.

Conversely, a steel which machines easily and allows for precise details such as the rifling, may not stand up well, or long, to the high pressure and high temperature of hot cartridges, or the abrasive qualities of some bullets.

Cold hammered steel is a manufacturing process, not a type of steel. It merely means the steel was worked into its final shape while at, or close to "room temperature" by striking it with large , usually hydraulically or pneumatically driven, tools.

It aligns the grain structure of most alloys of steel, but can cause them to be weakend because of a phenomena called "work hardening".

As applied to gun barrels, cold hammered steel means that the barrel blank started out pretty thick, was drilled, bored, or reamed for the bore, ground and shaped on the exterior to the desired contoured, then a mandrel with the reverse image of the desired rifling was lubed and slipped into the bore, and huge hydraulic or pneumatic hammers then pound the outside of the barrel, shrinking it down around the mandrel and , once the mandrel is withdrawn, leaving the rifling in the bore. A quick polishing of the bore to remove tool marks and burrs, and the barrel is done.

Hammer forged barrels are not "traditionally" thought of as accurate, but that doesn't mean they can't or won't be accurate.

I've owned or installed a number of cold hammer formed barrels that were barn burners when it came to accuracy, and then there were others that were only "so-so".......depends on the alloy, the manufacturing quality control, the impression tooling, etc.

All steels, including stainless steel, have carbon in them, so "carbon steel" really doesn't classify a particular alloy or group of alloys unless we know the percentage of carbon in the mixture.

High Carbon Steel, with amounts of carbon running from roughly 0.2% up to about 1.2%,

4140 is a "high carbon steel" with about 0.4% carbon, and it isn't too difficult to work efficiently and in good detail, 4150 is the same alloy , but with 0.5% carbon, which makes it much harder and much more difficult to work easily, but it resists wear better.

There's a lot more info on steels available, if you want it I can give you a run down on what's used for what, in terms of guns, but it's likely to put all ya'alls into a coma!

Moving on...........

Fluting looks good, gives you a larger surface area for cooling, but don't let anyone tell you that it makes the barrel more ridged!

The true cylindrical form is the most ridged shape there is when it comes to resisting both compression and tension from any direction, so removing metal to form the flutes, which lessens the cross section of the cylinder, will NOT make it stiffer. Ask any mechanical engineer, we'll all tell you the same thing.

As for the rate of twist, that is going to depend on what weight of projectile you intend to use most.

Shilen barrels has a rate of twist chart, by caliber, to help you figure out what you need as far as the twist goes, you can find it here:
http://shilen.com/calibersAndTwists.html

I don't have any experience shooting the 7 MM RUM but I do with the 30-378 Weatherby, it is a very flat shooting cartridge, plenty of terminal energy at some long distances, recoil is a bit "stout", a muzzle brake is a necessity, and it eats a LOT of powder in each cartridge when you hand load for it, and factory ammo is EXPENSIVE.
 

Ron_O

Cave Dweller
#5
The particular alloy of steel used for a barrel has pretty much zero to do with the rifles (potential) accuracy, but has everything to do with how it will stand up to the environments, hot loads, etc. as LONG AS the manufacturing process used to make the barrel is up to the task.

I say that because some alloys are notoriously difficult to work to accurate dimensions and to get crisp details in, and that can of course affect the rifling which in turn can affect accuracy.

If you have an alloy that is "gummy" as a machinist says, then it may be tough with some or all methods of rifling to get good, sharp, well defined lands and grooves.

Conversely, a steel which machines easily and allows for precise details such as the rifling, may not stand up well, or long, to the high pressure and high temperature of hot cartridges, or the abrasive qualities of some bullets.

Cold hammered steel is a manufacturing process, not a type of steel. It merely means the steel was worked into its final shape while at, or close to "room temperature" by striking it with large , usually hydraulically or pneumatically driven, tools.

It aligns the grain structure of most alloys of steel, but can cause them to be weakend because of a phenomena called "work hardening".

As applied to gun barrels, cold hammered steel means that the barrel blank started out pretty thick, was drilled, bored, or reamed for the bore, ground and shaped on the exterior to the desired contoured, then a mandrel with the reverse image of the desired rifling was lubed and slipped into the bore, and huge hydraulic or pneumatic hammers then pound the outside of the barrel, shrinking it down around the mandrel and , once the mandrel is withdrawn, leaving the rifling in the bore. A quick polishing of the bore to remove tool marks and burrs, and the barrel is done.

Hammer forged barrels are not "traditionally" thought of as accurate, but that doesn't mean they can't or won't be accurate.

I've owned or installed a number of cold hammer formed barrels that were barn burners when it came to accuracy, and then there were others that were only "so-so".......depends on the alloy, the manufacturing quality control, the impression tooling, etc.

All steels, including stainless steel, have carbon in them, so "carbon steel" really doesn't classify a particular alloy or group of alloys unless we know the percentage of carbon in the mixture.

High Carbon Steel, with amounts of carbon running from roughly 0.2% up to about 1.2%,

4140 is a "high carbon steel" with about 0.4% carbon, and it isn't too difficult to work efficiently and in good detail, 4150 is the same alloy , but with 0.5% carbon, which makes it much harder and much more difficult to work easily, but it resists wear better.

There's a lot more info on steels available, if you want it I can give you a run down on what's used for what, in terms of guns, but it's likely to put all ya'alls into a coma!

Moving on...........

Fluting looks good, gives you a larger surface area for cooling, but don't let anyone tell you that it makes the barrel more ridged!

The true cylindrical form is the most ridged shape there is when it comes to resisting both compression and tension from any direction, so removing metal to form the flutes, which lessens the cross section of the cylinder, will NOT make it stiffer. Ask any mechanical engineer, we'll all tell you the same thing.

As for the rate of twist, that is going to depend on what weight of projectile you intend to use most.

Shilen barrels has a rate of twist chart, by caliber, to help you figure out what you need as far as the twist goes, you can find it here:
http://shilen.com/calibersAndTwists.html

I don't have any experience shooting the 7 MM RUM but I do with the 30-378 Weatherby, it is a very flat shooting cartridge, plenty of terminal energy at some long distances, recoil is a bit "stout", a muzzle brake is a necessity, and it eats a LOT of powder in each cartridge when you hand load for it, and factory ammo is EXPENSIVE.
Great detail, exactly what I was hoping for, thanks for taking the time.

I'm also looking at the .300 RUM.

I've been sifting through the https://www.longrangehunting.com/ pages and gleaning a ton of info based on what those guys do regularly. They even have a lot of 2 mile shoots for kicks if you can imagine that. Total ballistics whores which I love reading about and lots of questions and answers about a variety of calibers and cartridges.

Even Kirby Allen chimes in about his custom factory builds and loads, but other posters who've bought from him have said they had to wait nearly FOUR YEARS to get their rifle! Huge backlog. He runs a one man shop out of Montana. http://apsrifles.com/ Probably should pick up a couple of employees.

Beautiful rifles and accessories as well as custom ammo loads.

Thanks for the twist charts. That explains a lot as it pertains to what's offered in the different rifles that I've been considering. I think my biggest beef has been a rifle that only offers a 24"-26" barrel when I'd prefer 28 or 30. I know you can swap out barrels but I might as well do a custom build if I'm going to go that route.

I'm trying to ignore the high cost of certain rounds. I really don't shoot that often so in the big picture long run it's not a real factor. I can drop a full box of ammo in a single hand of poker much of the time and not even bat an eye. It's all about priorities.

That too is helping me step up both the rifle that I want to buy as well as accessories. If I choose right it'll serve me the rest of my life so I'm fine with that. Barrel life probably won't be an issue and I'm not even sure if I'll be using a lot of really hot loads, though I may.

Depends on how much I end up hanging out on the Long Range Hunting site LOL.

Kirby Allen offers up a full custom rifle with scope for around $8k and it's stainless. Most of the other better rifles I'm looking at offer stainless as their 'best' guns as well so that's probably the answer there. For me now it's pretty much going to narrow down to the cartridge and round I want to end up with, followed by the rifle. Don't think I'll go to one of the custom cartridges that Kirby offers, I'll want something that I can pull off the shelf if he disappears.

Sounds like a muzzle brake is going to be a must for virtually all of the rounds I'm looking at. My last rifle was a 30-06 so getting thumped was something I was used to. Over time I learned that it was the extreme sound pressures that bothered me much more than the recoil.

Another thing is that despite the capabilities of the rifle and round I'm not sure that I'll be hunting (taking shots) out much further than 800 yards, due to the flight time in reaching the target. Animals move and I'm not into wounding game or making them suffer needlessly until they expire. But I like the idea of having that extended range capacity if I should indeed opt to shoot out into the 1200+ range.

I also like the idea of having it for a backup role as a SHTF rifle. That's when those two mile shots may indeed come in handy LOL. But a 444" drop and similar drift is pretty much unfathomable at those distances from a practical application point of view.

Still haven't ruled out a .338 but it looks like the Cheytac is a pretty solid choice as well. Still coming up to speed on what's really out there as it relates to what I may be hunting at some point in time down the road.

Thanks again for stepping in! This has been a great education along the way.
 

NYECOGunsmith

Obsessed Member
Staff member
Moderator
Forum Supporter
2019 Supporter
#6
Yup, tons of drop at long distances can be a real nuisance, that's for sure.

My Shiloh Sharps 45-110-550 with it's pet load drops 177 FEET at 1,000 yards when zeroed at 100 yards!

More like a mortar than a rifle, but fun to shoot. And I swear, on a calm day, you can hear that 550 grain slug smack the target even at 1k yards.

The muzzle brake will enhance, not mute the muzzle blast, but that .30-378 Weatherby without the muzzle brake just plain hurts, and I am not the least bit recoil sensitive. It has a very sharp slap to it, no matter how tight you have it tucked to your check and shoulder.

For cartridges like that, I always wear a pair of 33 decibel reduction well fitted ear plugs inside my ear muffs, you can't be too careful when it comes to ears and eyes.

Be careful with choosing those longer barrels, in some cartridges you can actually lose velocity after a certain point in barrel length.
Happens when drag starts to be an issue and all the propellant has already burned , pressure curve has peaked, and you still have another 2-4 inches of barrel to go through before you reach the exit sign.


For ammo availability for a long range gun in a SHTF situation, you would be better served in my opinion by one of the .300 Winchester, .338 Lapua crowd, although even the latter will not be on every gunshop shelf, and certainly not on Wal Mart's shelves! And brass is easier to come by for these as well.

Long range shooting at targets that might shoot back was my job for a long time, decades ago.

When they are at 1,000+ yards and don't know you are around, in a SHTF scenario, DON'T SHOOT at them. Better to stay hidden. Particularly if there is more than one of them.
There are very few scenarios in a SHTF world where you would be better off initiating contact at that distance, and then only if you were a very accomplished extreme distance rifleman.
Otherwise you just draw attention to yourself even if the first round is a kill, if there are multiple targets you are not going to get them all and now they are hunting you, bad juju there.

Now hunting game in a SHTF world at distance is another subject, never hunt close to your hide/home, and making a good long distance shot could be valuable, since it will let you see if anyone else is in the area and goes after the same game animal, and it gives you plenty of time to move slowly to where the animal went down, looking for tracks all around as you go (human tracks that is) and don't approach the animal from the line of the shot, come in from a quartering angle, so you don't get "surprised" by another "hunter".
That means you have to have a good solid fix on where the animal went down before you start circling and moving in.

The .30-378, the various Cheytac's, Lazzaroni's, Dakota Arms, etc. cartridges are hard to find, and someone's proprietary cartridge, as you mentioned, could disappear in a heart beat, but since 99% of those are formed from some parent cartridge, you could always make more yourself, although it can, for some cartridges, be rather labor intensive.
 
#7
Look at ammo prices before you go with .300 Wby. If it still looks good, go for it. It's an accurate round, recoil felt stout but manageable. Reloading will take some sting out. Then brass is the only sticking point.
 

Ron_O

Cave Dweller
#8
Yup, tons of drop at long distances can be a real nuisance, that's for sure.

My Shiloh Sharps 45-110-550 with it's pet load drops 177 FEET at 1,000 yards when zeroed at 100 yards!

More like a mortar than a rifle, but fun to shoot. And I swear, on a calm day, you can hear that 550 grain slug smack the target even at 1k yards.

Ka-THUMP!! Trajectory is sort of like throwing a lead fishing weight off a bridge!

The muzzle brake will enhance, not mute the muzzle blast, but that .30-378 Weatherby without the muzzle brake just plain hurts, and I am not the least bit recoil sensitive. It has a very sharp slap to it, no matter how tight you have it tucked to your check and shoulder.

I think I'm going to go with a muzzle brake with all of the rounds that I'm looking at. Seems like common sense now.

For cartridges like that, I always wear a pair of 33 decibel reduction well fitted ear plugs inside my ear muffs, you can't be too careful when it comes to ears and eyes.

Unfortunately I think I picked up some hearing loss at a very early age while shooting high powered rounds at an early age, nearly 50 years ago when we weren't so savvy about ear protection. I didn't even know I had a loss until I was tested as a firefighter.

Be careful with choosing those longer barrels, in some cartridges you can actually lose velocity after a certain point in barrel length.
Happens when drag starts to be an issue and all the propellant has already burned , pressure curve has peaked, and you still have another 2-4 inches of barrel to go through before you reach the exit sign.

Great info. That may explain why for some rounds only a 26" barrel is offered while with others it's 28", same manufacturer. The Long Range Hunting guys go with longer barrels but they're shooting some hot custom rounds.

For ammo availability for a long range gun in a SHTF situation, you would be better served in my opinion by one of the .300 Winchester, .338 Lapua crowd, although even the latter will not be on every gunshop shelf, and certainly not on Wal Mart's shelves! And brass is easier to come by for these as well.

I know. I'm erring on the side of percentages, that we'll never be in that situation so I can keep an extra box or more on hand and stock up when it looks like things are heading our way. My 12 gauge is my go-to SHTF weapon as a general rule.

Long range shooting at targets that might shoot back was my job for a long time, decades ago.

When they are at 1,000+ yards and don't know you are around, in a SHTF scenario, DON'T SHOOT at them. Better to stay hidden. Particularly if there is more than one of them.
There are very few scenarios in a SHTF world where you would be better off initiating contact at that distance, and then only if you were a very accomplished extreme distance rifleman.
Otherwise you just draw attention to yourself even if the first round is a kill, if there are multiple targets you are not going to get them all and now they are hunting you, bad juju there.

Great advice. I'd be more interested in 'select targets', if you get my drift.

Now hunting game in a SHTF world at distance is another subject, never hunt close to your hide/home, and making a good long distance shot could be valuable, since it will let you see if anyone else is in the area and goes after the same game animal, and it gives you plenty of time to move slowly to where the animal went down, looking for tracks all around as you go (human tracks that is) and don't approach the animal from the line of the shot, come in from a quartering angle, so you don't get "surprised" by another "hunter".
That means you have to have a good solid fix on where the animal went down before you start circling and moving in.

Great advice. Hadn't really thought about it much.

The .30-378, the various Cheytac's, Lazzaroni's, Dakota Arms, etc. cartridges are hard to find, and someone's proprietary cartridge, as you mentioned, could disappear in a heart beat, but since 99% of those are formed from some parent cartridge, you could always make more yourself, although it can, for some cartridges, be rather labor intensive.

LOL, not sure I could mod a casing with a hammer and chisel but maybe over time!
I'm still researching this but you've given some great answers. Still researching rounds but I think I want to avoid the 1-off's that I can't find online without a huge waiting time. I might even head down to Walmart just to see what they keep on their shelves, though what's carried in Wyoming may be a lot different than here in LV.

I was looking at a .300 RUM last night and Nosler makes an awesome round for it. Check it out! I think this would be the ideal all around round for most of what I expect to use this for.

If I went with this, or something similar, I'd want to stock up a bit after trying things out, but more than a few boxes would get my normal needs a bunch of years into the future.

If properly stored, what kind of shelf life could I expect from a quality round? I had some stuff from the 70's that I picked up from an estate sale several years back that was still shooting great.

<TABLE class="table table-striped table-condensed"> <TBODY> <TR> <TH>Caliber</TH> <TD>300 Remington Ultra Magnum (RUM)</TD></TR> <TR> <TH>Bullet Type</TH> <TD>Partition</TD></TR> <TR> <TH>Bullet Weight</TH> <TD>165 GR</TD></TR> <TR> <TH>Muzzle Energy</TH> <TD>4110 ft lbs</TD></TR> <TR> <TH>Muzzle Velocity</TH> <TD>3350 fps</TD></TR> <TR> <TH>Rounds Per Box</TH> <TD>20</TD></TR> <TR> <TH>Boxes Per Case</TH> <TD>10</TD></TR> <TR> <TH>Casing Material</TH> <TD>Brass</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
https://www.whisperfirearms.com/products/rifle-nosler-nosler-custom-054041600644


Here's a similar round in the 7mm RUM rather than the .300:

<TABLE class="table table-striped table-condensed"> <TBODY> <TR> <TH>Caliber</TH> <TD>7mm Remington Ultra Magnum (RUM)</TD></TR> <TR> <TH>Bullet Type</TH> <TD>Hollow Point Boat Tail</TD></TR> <TR> <TH>Bullet Weight</TH> <TD>168 GR</TD></TR> <TR> <TH>Muzzle Energy</TH> <TD>4012 ft lbs</TD></TR> <TR> <TH>Muzzle Velocity</TH> <TD>3279 fps</TD></TR> <TR> <TH>Rounds Per Box</TH> <TD>20</TD></TR> <TR> <TH>Boxes Per Case</TH> <TD>1</TD></TR> <TR> <TH>Application</TH> <TD>Hunting/Target</TD></TR> <TR> <TH>Casing Material</TH> <TD>Brass</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
https://www.whisperfirearms.com/products/rifle-hsm-trophy-gold-837306004650


But the 30-338 smokes them both:

<TABLE class="table table-striped table-condensed"> <TBODY> <TR> <TH>Caliber</TH> <TD>30-378 Weatherby Magnum</TD></TR> <TR> <TH>Bullet Type</TH> <TD>Nosler Ballistic Tip</TD></TR> <TR> <TH>Bullet Weight</TH> <TD>165 GR</TD></TR> <TR> <TH>Muzzle Energy</TH> <TD>4488 ft lbs</TD></TR> <TR> <TH>Muzzle Velocity</TH> <TD>3500 fps</TD></TR> <TR> <TH>Rounds Per Box</TH> <TD>20</TD></TR> <TR> <TH>Boxes Per Case</TH> <TD>1</TD></TR> <TR> <TH>Application</TH> <TD>Hunting/Target</TD></TR> <TR> <TH>Casing Material</TH> <TD>Brass</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
https://www.whisperfirearms.com/products/rifle-weatherby-nosler-747115025756


And finally the .300 Weatherby Magnum:

<TABLE class="table table-striped table-condensed"> <TBODY> <TR> <TH>Caliber</TH> <TD>300 Weatherby Magnum</TD></TR> <TR> <TH>Bullet Type</TH> <TD>Nosler Ballistic Tip</TD></TR> <TR> <TH>Bullet Weight</TH> <TD>165 GR</TD></TR> <TR> <TH>Muzzle Energy</TH> <TD>4111 ft lbs</TD></TR> <TR> <TH>Muzzle Velocity</TH> <TD>3350 fps</TD></TR> <TR> <TH>Rounds Per Box</TH> <TD>20</TD></TR> <TR> <TH>Boxes Per Case</TH> <TD>1</TD></TR> <TR> <TH>Application</TH> <TD>Hunting/Target</TD></TR> <TR> <TH>Casing Material</TH> <TD>Brass</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
https://www.whisperfirearms.com/products/rifle-weatherby-nosler-747115025428


And here's the .300 Win Mag. Couldn't find it in Nosler in a 165 weight.

<TABLE class="table table-striped table-condensed"> <TBODY> <TR> <TH>Caliber</TH> <TD>300 Winchester Magnum</TD></TR> <TR> <TH>Bullet Type</TH> <TD>Hollow Point Boat Tail</TD></TR> <TR> <TH>Bullet Weight</TH> <TD>168 GR</TD></TR> <TR> <TH>Muzzle Energy</TH> <TD>3804 ft lbs</TD></TR> <TR> <TH>Muzzle Velocity</TH> <TD>3193 fps</TD></TR> <TR> <TH>Rounds Per Box</TH> <TD>20</TD></TR> <TR> <TH>Boxes Per Case</TH> <TD>1</TD></TR> <TR> <TH>Casing Material</TH> <TD>Brass</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>

https://www.whisperfirearms.com/products/rifle-hsm-trophy-gold-837306001611
 

NYECOGunsmith

Obsessed Member
Staff member
Moderator
Forum Supporter
2019 Supporter
#9
"If properly stored, what kind of shelf life could I expect from a quality round? I had some stuff from the 70's that I picked up from an estate sale several years back that was still shooting great.
"

Stored in a cool, dark, dry place probably 100 years, maybe more.

I have large amounts of 1914 through 1917 manufactured 30'06 ammo that has been properly stored (as far as I know, at least since 1950!) all it's life, and it all goes bang (so far) on the first try.

Of course it is corrosive priming, and the chemists say that lasts longer than non corrosive priming. The primers and case necks are all sealed with lacquer and well.
 

Ron_O

Cave Dweller
#10
Look at ammo prices before you go with .300 Wby. If it still looks good, go for it. It's an accurate round, recoil felt stout but manageable. Reloading will take some sting out. Then brass is the only sticking point.
Thanks. I've kind of shifted gears in the price category. I can find a great gun for not a lot of money and it'll frankly work great for my hunting needs. I used to focus on efficiency, find what's needed at the most reasonable price, emphasis on NEED. My old 30-06 worked just great for my needs.

But now I want to go for more precision as a multi-purpose rifle. A fast, flat, hard hitting round that's extremely reliable in the field. I used to pay around $20 a box for shells!

But in reality a single box of shells lasted me for YEARS so the cost was pretty insignificant. I see a quality rifle as a priority now, and since my last one lasted me over 30 years and was still working like day one, I want to treat myself to something I can use the rest of my life without feeling that I compromised. Even the price of the 30-378's doesn't phase me.