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Bought myself a mini lathe..

NYECOGunsmith

Obsessed Member
Staff member
Moderator
Looks good. Not sure what you mean by indicate the DRO slides though.
If you mean do you have to somehow indicate a zero starting point with reference to the table's location or the spindle's, the answer is nope, no need, or way, to do that actually.
'
 

Pcmaker

Obsessed Member
Yeah, it wasn't as complicated as I thought it was going to be. Good thing my DRO set came with various brackets and various length allen screws.

The videos I've seen of DRO installations almost always seem to end with them indicating the DRO slides for some reason. I was kinda worried that I might get an inaccurate reading.

Another thing is that I wasn't able to put any of the DRO slide covers on. It wasn't possible the way they had to be set up. I'll do that sometime in the future.
 

TexasJackKin

Breathng Free, at last
Forum Supporter
Not 100% sure just what you mean by indicating the slide. You do want it running true to the axis, otherwise you will be measuring the hypotenuse rather than the actual movement. If your DRO has resolution of 0.0005 (half a thousands) probably wouldn’t make much difference, if you have 0.0001 (one tenth of a thousands) it might.
 

Pcmaker

Obsessed Member
Yeah, I just slapped on the scale on the sides and "eyed" its levelness and I don't think it's perfectly flush mounted since the finish on the cast iron parts of the mill is pretty rough. I was worried this was going to affect accuracy.
 

TexasJackKin

Breathng Free, at last
Forum Supporter
Flush probably doesn't matter, as long as the scale is not under any stress, i.e. the scale should not have to "spring" any when you bolted it up.
 
Hi All:
I am back up and running. Making Brass chips this time, no stringers just little chips and thank God for safety glasses. I switched VFD models for a newer next generation model. The problem was I put an on/off switch before the VFD and the machine rev/off/fwd switch was not to be used. You have to let the VFD control these functions.This was stated in the manual of the new VFD and it also made the instructions easier to understand as to how to reset the 50htz limit to the 60htz that it was to run at.
Now the next problem I have is to get a water soluble oil for my coolant tank.

jimf5
 

Pcmaker

Obsessed Member
I ordered a block of steel from eBay to replace my compound slide. I"ll be putting it back on when I'm doing tapers, but this block will be on normally for increased rigidity.
 

NYECOGunsmith

Obsessed Member
Staff member
Moderator
Hi All:
I am back up and running. Making Brass chips this time, no stringers just little chips and thank God for safety glasses. I switched VFD models for a newer next generation model. The problem was I put an on/off switch before the VFD and the machine rev/off/fwd switch was not to be used. You have to let the VFD control these functions.This was stated in the manual of the new VFD and it also made the instructions easier to understand as to how to reset the 50htz limit to the 60htz that it was to run at.
Now the next problem I have is to get a water soluble oil for my coolant tank.

jimf5
Rustlick ws 50/50 is a good one, used it or years with good results.
 

Pcmaker

Obsessed Member
Just bought a metric counterbore set from Amazon so I can countersink my m8-1.25 shoulder bolts.

I have the X axis trammed on my mill to under .001

My Y axis, though, is off by .006

Gonna figure out how to tram it. I haven't checked the manual yet, but it looks like I might have to do some shimming.
 

Pcmaker

Obsessed Member
That sucks. The manual says the Y axis was trammed by them and should be true. I'm thinking of just using 2 small pieces of paper since each piece is about .003 from what I've read.
 

NYECOGunsmith

Obsessed Member
Staff member
Moderator
Yah, paper , depending on the bond weight and finish will run .003 to .0035" thick, but if you use paper and any oil seeps to the edge of the paper, it will wick into the entire length of your shim and change the shim thickness.
Get a couple of cheap feeler gauge sets from Harbor freight, use those on each side to figure out how much shim thickness you need at each point the table bears on in the Y axis, then go to McFadden Dale, Granger, MSC, etc. and buy some small pieces of shim stock and cut to fit and you're done.

If you can get it to within .001" in all directions (X and Y) I wouldn't' sweat trying to get it any closer, you are not likely to be working on anything big enough that needs to be more precise than .001" taper over say 12 inches of length. Besides, flex in the end mill, spring back in the work piece, jaws of the vise, and spindle flex and spring back will give you a bit more than that even on a big Bridgeport or Lagun or Haas , etc. vertical mill.

Remember the old machinist's advice: Don't sweat the petty stuff and don't pet the sweaty stuff.
 

Pcmaker

Obsessed Member
Not sure what happened, but I had to add 10 pieces of paper until I got to within .002 of the Y axis. It was .006 this morning, but loosening the 4 bolts that supports the column shifted things around.

I'm off to get some feeler gauges from Auto Zone.
 

NYECOGunsmith

Obsessed Member
Staff member
Moderator
Yup, not surprised at the results, paper is handy for a quick temp gauge shim, but tends to compress unevenly when you tighten it down and will swell with humidity changes as well.

Stainless steel makes the best shim stock, followed by carbon steel. Brass, aluminum, and copper can be used, but you have to calculate the crush factor with those softer metals based on your object's weight and the torque specs, so I usually just go with Stainless Steel shim stock and forget about all that math.

That .001 should be more than adequate for 99.9999999999% of your machining needs, good job! Post some pics of the latest set up when you have a chance..