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Bought myself a mini lathe..

TexasJackKin

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[QUOTE="NYECOGunsmith, post: 1258685,

That .001 should be more than adequate for 99.9999999999% of your machining needs, good job! Post some pics of the latest set up when you have a chance..[/QUOTE]
I think you might have gotten one more decimal place than you meant to, I belive you ment to say 99.999999999, or maybe I miscalculated it...... Or maybe it was a rounding error.....
 

NYECOGunsmith

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Good catch, was only supposed to be nine nines, cat held the key down a fraction of a second too long, happens when I let here type while she's watching squirrels outside the window.
 

Pcmaker

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Now that my mill has been trammed, I'm thinking of indicating the bottom of my vise where my work pieces sit most of the time. I have a Precision Matthews 6" vise that I bought along with my mill. I'm thinking it's flat, but you never know.
 

NYECOGunsmith

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That's handy (having the bottom of the vise jaw bed parallel to the table) if you are going to be working on a lot of pieces that already have parallel sides, but most of the time you tap it flat down against the vise bed, or the tops of your parallels, and then you mill the top, flip it over 180° and mill it again and now the sides ARE parallel for sure.
Get in the habit of every time you open the vise up to insert a work piece or the parallels and then the work piece, that you wipe the faces of the fixed and moving jaws, and the bed rails and the junction of the bed rails and jaws, with a clean cloth, then look in there to be sure there are no particles or chips of ANY size before you set the workpiece or the parallels down in there and start the clamping.

Even a very tiny chip can throw off the accuracy of the work.
 

Pcmaker

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That part's original. The only thing I made is the block on top of that. I anchored it via 6 M8 bolts. The block of steel I milled cost me almost $50 on eBay. I don't have any dovetail cutters... yet.
 

Pcmaker

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Thanks. Still trying to get a good finish, though. I have one of those 2" indexable carbide endmills. I thought it would be better than a flycutter
 

NYECOGunsmith

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Opinions vary on which will give the finer finish, the indexable face mill (that's what it really is, a face milling cutter) or a fly cutter.

I'm in the fly cutter camp, because I can grind the tool bit angles to suit the work material, and being high speed steel, it won't be as tough to get a fine finish with it if you can't find the right RPM speed and feed rate and depth of cut as it is with the indexable carbide inserts on the face mill. Carbide is a good bit more finicky in my opinion when it comes to getting the RPM, feed rate and DOC right in order to get a good surface finish.

High Speed Steel is a lot more forgiving, and if you have to make interrupted cuts on the lathe or the mill (which you would be doing if you surfaced that plate now that the holes and counterbores have been put in) the HSS will take that in stride, Carbide will frequently chip or shatter if making an interrupted cut.

Just my personal opinion and 2 cents worth, a real machinist probably has a totally different one.
 

Pcmaker

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Not to mention fly cutters being a lot more affordable. If I chip one of my carbide inserts, I have to buy another one. I can just grind the HSS if I chip it. I should've bought that first instead of my face mill.
 

TexasJackKin

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I've got to agree with Steve, a fly cutter just seems to be easier to get a good finish with. You can be creative with the grind, I've even cut dove tails with a fly cutter, and corner radius, champers and what not, and even a poor man's boring head. Now, if you really need to shovel the material off, you can't beat a indexable face mill.
 

NYECOGunsmith

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Well, you could make yourself a hex broach, drill the appropriate sized hole, and then broach it with your broach and a press (arbor or hydraulic) , or spend mega bucks and buy a hex rotary drill bit (yes, you can drill a hex hole, or a penta hole, or a square hole, or darn near any other sided hole you want, but the tooling is expensive) or you could just think outside the box, and make your wheel, drill the appropriate sized round hole in it and then weld or pin in a cheap socket with the right sized hex opening in the socket. Shop flea markets, harbor freight, garage sales, thrift shops, etc. and find a socket for a 3/4" or 19mm hex head bolt, that's the most common size for the shafts on mill vises, and then like I said, weld it into the handle, or pin it in.

And of course you could always drill a round hole and file to hex, but that takes a lot of time and patience. Or drill just 6 small holes for the corners of the hex then mill out the center, that will also work.

Here's some info on drilling hex holes for ya:
https://makezine.com/2011/03/14/drilling-square-and-hexagonal-holes/

I am acquainted with Rick, he has some great videos out there.
https://rick.sparber.org/dhh.pdf

Here's one way to make a broach to broach the hole, but for one as large as a vise handle, you would need a fairly hefty hydraulic press, 20 tons or better to do it easily.
https://www.instructables.com/id/How-To-Make-A-Hexagonal-Hole-In-Metal/
 
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NYECOGunsmith

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Get one that can be used both horizontally and vertically, and that has a chuck as well as a face plate. You probably don't need a super spacer (really fancy rotab that does indexing and dividing) but having an indexer on the rotab can be nice.

Get one that is as big as the table will handle (for size and weight) without sucking up too much of the max distance between your table and the spindle, oh, and that you can afford and LIFT!
They can be heavy.

Get the tail stock that goes with it, so you can support the outboard ends of things being held with the rotab in the vertical position (table faces left or right, in the horizontal position table faces up towards the spindle) so you can make splined shafts, pins, etc. without too much spring back.
 

NYECOGunsmith

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No, as long as you mount the workpiece securely to the rotab, and the workpiece isn't interferring with the rotabs crank, and isn't too heavy for the mill table weight wise ( weight of rotab plus workpiece I mean) you can do that.
 

TexasJackKin

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Seems like rotating tables and dividing heads, are almost a thing of the past, with the advent of CNC everything. But I've always found rotary tables and dividing heads heads to be very useful. For bolt circles, you can always make coordinate moves, but making timing couplings, it's hard to beat a rotary tables....unless of course, you've got a CNC machine..... You're on your way down the rabbit hole!