Bought myself a mini lathe..

NYECOGunsmith

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#61
Get up to speed on the lathe, then I will introduce you to the surface grinder, shaper horizontal mill and planer!
BAAAWWAAAAHAHAHAHAAA!
 

TexasJackKin

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#62
Get up to speed on the lathe, then I will introduce you to the surface grinder, shaper horizontal mill and planer!
BAAAWWAAAAHAHAHAHAAA!
You've got a shaper? Wow, that's old school, right there! Don't see them around much anymore, but you can sure shovel the material off with one! You can hear the chips ring, when they hit the floor!
 
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NYECOGunsmith

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#63
Nope, sold my Atlas 16" shaper with the shop, and the planer, surface grinder and the horizontal mill, and regret selling all three! Still looking for a small Atlas or other shaper in the 6"-10" size for the current hobby machine shop, and a small horizontal mill too, although I could just buy the horizontal mill attachments for the Bridgeport.

The planer was given to me, I restored it just for fun, it took up a lot of space. Had a usable bed space of 5 feet wide by 12 feet long, thing was a monster at over 20,000 pounds.
If you have never seen one, think of an inverse shaper, with the planer, the bed shifts forward and backward and left and right and provides the driving force to drive the workpiece against the cutting tool, which remains stationary. You can put one single cutting tool on it like a shaper, or a gang of them, and unlike a shaper, you can put two tools in it back to back so that it cuts on the forward stroke and the rearward one. The rear stroke tool is usually ground as a finisher, with the forward stroke tool being a rougher.

The one I had was a double column style , big green monster made by Hendy Iron Works in 1912, it had (by the time I got it) been converted from line shaft drive to a 20 HP 3 Phase motor running at 440 VAC. My shop had that power available, and that monster was something to see making chips. Never used it much, not at all for gunsmithing, did machine a few cylinder heads from large earth movers with it for a buddy's construction company, , it was mostly a show piece, I set it up where the customers could see it through a big plate glass window and let it run with not cutting tool in it and a big old slab of steel road plate bolted to the table.
 

NYECOGunsmith

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#65
Or 3 strong buddies, 2-4 guys can lift that if you are careful. But the engine hoist would be safer. Harbor Freight one will do it nicely.
 

Pcmaker

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#66
Yeah, I was looking at the Harbor Freight one. I might need to be taking it down for some reason in the future, so might as well get the hoist.
 

NYECOGunsmith

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#70
What's the old saying?

You can make anything with a shaper... Except a profit.
Back in the day you could make a profit with a shaper, if the customer wasn't in a hurry! A shaper can pretty much make all of it's own parts, and uses tooling that is a lot cheaper (lathe tool bits purpose ground) that end mills, face mills, etc. are for the vertical mill , or milling cutters were for the horizontal mill.

The shaper is just slow, but you could set the mechanical limit dogs on it, table feed, etc. and then turn it on and walk away to do something else, When it finished you could hear it stop and go back to it to start another piece. So it kind of let you do two things at once.

Only thing slower though was the original shaper...……...rock hammer, rock chisel and rock workpiece, banging out a part on those really took a long time! And you had to keep one eye peeled for marauding T-Rex's while you chiseled.
 
#71
Hi All:
Well after long week or so I put in a 40 ft. run of 220 volt power to my garage and put in the 3 phase converter NYCO suggested. All this was started just in time for the 100+ temp to affect my install time. Finished this morning and after a little adjustment made some CHIPS ! I have to make it a little more permanent and clean it up, and check/change all the fluids.
Just want to thank all who helped me thru my install.
jimf5
In Pahrump
 

NYECOGunsmith

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#72
You know the rules, Jim, pictures or video of the chips or it didn't' happen! :devilish:
Congrats on getting your new addiction up and running. Changing the oil, checking the way wipers, etc. is a good idea, and then turn a test bar to see if your tailstock is in alignment with your head stock.
Oh, and did you level the lathe and check the ways to be sure they are level and not twisted?
 

Pcmaker

Obsessed Member
#73
I get my mill on Monday. I made some adjustments to my work bench for it to be able to handle the weight of the mill, which is 275 lbs. Plus all the other random items and tooling that will be sitting on the bench. I added a couple of slots for 2 drawers to go into.

 

Pcmaker

Obsessed Member
#75
I might be stopping by the place you mentioned earlier in the thread, Brass and Copper Sales, in Pahrump to get some various scrap metals for me to play with. Do they sell by weight or by pieces?
 

NYECOGunsmith

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#76
Brass and Copper sales is in VEGAS, not Pahrump.
Its at 3935 north pecos rd, lv, 89115.

They sell by the piece for full pieces and cuts, and by the pound for off cuts from t h e scrap bin, which is the way to go for the home hobby machinist, from the scrap bin.
 

NYECOGunsmith

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#77
Just dropped a HOW TO into the bucket for those with a lathe, brief info on how to accurately duplicate factory screws for guns when there is no screw blank or direct replacement available, and you know the thread size and diameter.
See the post on How To Duplicate Factory Machine Screws
 

NYECOGunsmith

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#79
That looks like a 4 inch vise, and yes, it would be a bit big for that mill, but you can learn to work around it just fine.
Have you trammed the mill's head to the table yet, and to the fixed jaw of the vise also?
Gotta arrange some time for you to visit my shop and learn to do that, plus how to use the various indictors you need, and how to clamp stuff to the table properly when it won't fit in the vise, and how to turn the handles properly to move the table smoothly, plus maybe a few dozen other things that will keep you from hurting the mill or yourself or the cutters!

Nice looking bench mill by the way.
 
#80
Been trying to tram the fixed end of the vise. I also added a lamp I bought from Goodwill to the mains of the mill. I also got rid of the plastic safety screen. It was just getting too much in the way, not to mention, I can't see much through it.