Bought myself a mini lathe..

#81
Well it has been a very long time since i had chips in my hair. I finished up hard wiring up the converter (220w 1 phase to 220w 3 phase) late yesterday and finally got to try every thing out. I checked out the fluids and all seemed o.k. I found a piece of round aluminum and made some chips.
Now time to get some tooling, first change all the fluids, and practice using the machine.
Nyco wanted pics of the chips so look hard they are there and one of the tooling that came with the machine. also in tooling pic is the phase converter install.
jimf5 in Pahrump
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NYECOGunsmith

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#83
It's the right color for a Kurt, or pretty close, but I think it's that Taiwanese clone who's name escapes me at the moment, but they are pretty good in their own right, I have the 6 inch one, and it's been just fine, and about half the price of the Kurt 680 series.
Jim, I see the chips, so you are off the hook! Those look like 5C collets in the rack, did the lathe come with a 5C collet chuck?

Edit: Went back and looked at the pictures of the Clausing , I can see it has a collet chuck on it, probably the 5C, although I suppose it could be a 3C or one of the J series, but the collets look like 5C's.

Guess we are gonna have to start a subsection of the forum for machining stuff, maybe give it password protection to keep all the non machining type riff raff like LoneRider, Geo, Tophog,, GullWing, etc. out!

Just kidding guys, the more you learn about how to make the parts, the better off you will be, even if you have someone else do it for you., if you know how it is done, then you can at least better judge if you got your money's worth when you pay someone to do it for you.
 

TexasJackKin

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#84
yeah, I was going off the color, and general look of the vise. Kurt vises can be a bit on the pricey side $$$ but nice!
Keep in mind, you can add a bit of rigidity, by taking that vise off the swivel base. Usually plenty of slop in the mounting bolts to sweep the stationary jaw. And one stud and one clamp and a little trig, will get you any angle you might need, with far more accuracy than trying to read it off the protractor on the base.
 

NYECOGunsmith

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#85
^^^ Yup, that's the way I have always set mine up, old Chief SOH CAH TOA can help you find the measurements to get any angle you want on the fixed jaw, and if it's a sine vise that's going to be locked in this vise to give you a compound angle, , that's just as easy to set, as long as you have an accurate set of gauge blocks or spacer blocks to work with.
 

NYECOGunsmith

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#87
My boss's dad was an engineer for NASA and he just gave me a lot of machining tools and some he claims were used on engineering for the Apollo 11.
On the machinist forum's the above is what we call a "TOOL GLOAT"...…...and it doesn't count unless you post pictures of the tools! At which time, if you really scored a haul (of machinist treasure) the membership will give you a hearty round of "YOU SUCK!", because it should have been each and every one of us who scored that haul and we are all demonstrating our envy of you.

So pics or it didn't happen!
 

TexasJackKin

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#88
^^^ Yup, that's the way I have always set mine up, old Chief SOH CAH TOA can help you find the measurements to get any angle you want on the fixed jaw, and if it's a sine vise that's going to be locked in this vise to give you a compound angle, , that's just as easy to set, as long as you have an accurate set of gauge blocks or spacer blocks to work with.
I had to google SOH CAH TOA, yup that's it. I always open the "easy trig book" then any dummy with a calculator can look like a geinous gieonse smart.
 
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NYECOGunsmith

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#89
SOH CAH TOA, for those who didn't take trig, is the acronym to remember how to solve right triangles. In any problem involving right triangles, you will generally have at least three pieces of information about the triangle, as in two angles and the length of the side between them, the length of two sides and the angle between them, etc. and with that info you can find all the angles (you only have to find two, come on, it's a right triangle so you KNOW right off the bat that one angle is 90 degrees, right>>>??!! ) and the length of the two sides and the hypotenuse (the longest side is called the hypotenuse).

SOH stands for Sine equals the Opposite Side Divided by the Hypotenuse.
So if you know the degrees in an angle of a right triangle, you can look up the sine of that angle, and then the sine of the angle will be equal to the length of the side OPPOSITE the angle , divided by the length of the Hypotenuse. So you can find the angle if you know the length of the opposite side (the one that faces the angle) and the hypotenuse. Or you can find the length of either the opposite side or the hypotenuse if you know the angle and it's sine, and the missing side from the SOH equation.

CAH stands for Cosine equals the ADJACENT Side length divided by the length of the Hypotenuse, so you can solve this one the same as you do the Sine one, but by using the lengths of the Adjacent side (one end of the side touches the angle, and forms one side of the angle) and the Hypotenuse, or as with the Sine, you could find the angle if you know the length of the Adjacent side and the hypotenuse, or find the length of either of those two sides if you know the other side from the CAH equation and the angle.

TOA stands for Tangent equals the Opposite Side divided by the Adjacent side and works just like the two above, given any two parts of the equation you can solve for the third part.

And once you have two sides of the triangle, of course you can solve for the length of the third side using the old Pythagorean Formula of
A (squared) plus B (squared) equals C(squared) or as it is usually written A²+B²=C², where A and B are the two sides of the right triangle which meet to form the 90 degree right angle, and C is the hypotenuse, which is the longest side, and is opposite the Right Angle.

That's your Trig lesson for today, Trig is one of the most useful forms of math for a machinist, and can be used to solve many problems in machining in the shop, and in carpentry, etc.
 
#90
I left the other stuff at work, but I took this one home. I don't know what it is, except for it looks like some kind of vise. It doesn't lock, I think it's missing the rod that holds the sliding part in place. I'll take pics of the other stuff. He's gonna be bringing me a lot more stuff from his dad. he's got a bucket full of random drill bits that have only been used once. His dad told him that at NASA, they use one drill bit to make one hole, then they toss it. He says he's got HSS, cobalt, etc.. drill bits in alphabetical and metric sizes, short stubby ones, etc..

A lot of the stuff I got I have no idea what they're for. I got a what looks like a precision MT2 keyless chuck that's made in Spain. Anyway, I'll take more pics and post em. Maybe you guys can figure them out.

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NYECOGunsmith

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#91
That's a machinists screwless vise, also called a toolmakers vise or insert vise. You move the jaw up againt the workpiece and put the cross rod thru the nearest hole to the back of the sliding jaw, put the bolt in from the back and tighten it down.
That pulls the moveable jaw forward AND down against the workpiece, helping to prevent it from lifting up and out of the vise as can happen with the average screw type vise, other than those like the Kurt angle lock type.
 

NYECOGunsmith

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#93
I had to google SOH CAH TOA, yup that's it. I always open the "easy trig book" then any dummy with a calculator can look like a geinous gieonse smart.
I'm old, when SOH CAH TOA was invented, books were carved in stone using T-REX bone chisels and a rock hammer, and were too heavy for a puny guy like me to carry around, so we had to mesmerize all that stuff! Now, a CASIO FX115ES calculator resides next to my mill and lathe and easy chair, and it does all the heavy trig thunkin fer me.
 

TexasJackKin

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#94
I'm old, when SOH CAH TOA was invented, books were carved in stone using T-REX bone chisels and a rock hammer, and were too heavy for a puny guy like me to carry around, so we had to mesmerize all that stuff! Now, a CASIO FX115ES calculator resides next to my mill and lathe and easy chair, and it does all the heavy trig thunkin fer me.
Yeah, and now we can get our numbers out to about 15 decimal places!
 

Pcmaker

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#97
Yep, both my lathe and mill will eventually have DROs. I had the option to have one put on my mill, but it added $600 extra to the total. It was 3 axis. I think I only really need X and Y for the mill.
 

TexasJackKin

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#98
Yeah, a DRO on a mill is the Bees Knees. I've never found them all that useful on a lathe. A travel dial on a lathe, on the other hand, can be handy now and then. Maybe I'm just old school.... or maybe just old...
 

Pcmaker

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#99
I want to use this chuck on my tailstock. I'm trying to figure out if I can take the spindle out and somehow put in a MT2 taper. I also got these laterals that slide in half. I'm guessing it's for milling angles?




 

TexasJackKin

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Those are adjustable parallels, handy for a bunch of stuff, they are great for measuring slots, setting sine bars, and a bunch of other stuff. Not sure on that particular drill chuck, but most have a tapered mount drawn in by a screw. Open the chuck all the way, and see if you can see a screw head in the center. If so, remove the screw and give the arbor a sharp wack (with a punch from inside the chuck) and it should pop right off.

That looks like it might be an Albrecht keyless drill chuck. If so, those are great chucks, don't bugger it up! I've never used one on the tail stock of a lathe, but have used them a lot on drill presses and milling machines (for drilling only) They are hard to beat.