Boy Scout Auction Knife

jseymour

Obsessed Member
#1
Hey everyone sorry for not posting in a while. Had to take a night job to pay the bills and am just starting to get caught up enough to get the shop going again. I had to completely shut it down for awhile. Now that I'm back I was contacted about making a knife for a local Boy Scout Auction.

So I'm going to document here and have it finished in time for the auction. I will be making about 4 knives at the same time with different levels of finish to show off a model I call the outdoorsman. Each will be saber ground, made from O1 tool steel and 52100.

I picked up the last of the material for the two fancy ones today at McFadden Dales. Here are the first two up at bat.



Both of these are O1 tool steel. One will have Stainless Steel liners, bolster, corby bolts, ferro rod, with an ebony handle . The other will have copper liners, bolster, corby bolts ferro rod, and ironwood handle.

A field grade version with walnut handles and stainless steel corbys will be cut out tomorrow, as well as a tactical version that will have G10 handles and chainring bolts, and cerakoted with kydex sheath.

The boy scout knife will be the Ironwood handled knife. So I will have to make it first due to the time line and possibly forgo the professional photography on it. The rest will be photo'd by a pro so I can use it on instagram as well as for a future website.
 

gixxer760

Domestic Terrorist aka pa
Forum Supporter
#2
tag cause i havent seen you make anything that im glad someone else bought. im kinda broke and REALLY have to talk myself out of spending the coin on these knives.

also hope your business kicks off man, you do some amazing work.
 

gixxer760

Domestic Terrorist aka pa
Forum Supporter
#3
tag cause i havent seen you make anything that im glad someone else bought. im kinda broke and REALLY have to talk myself out of spending the coin on these knives.

also hope your business kicks off man, you do some amazing work.
 

lawsandguns

uber Member
Forum Supporter
#4
Thanks for posting this on here. I look forward to seeing the work in progress. I will let some folks know about the thread so they can check out the build.

I saw your other thread about a potential reality show and noticed you were dealing with legal/contracts. I'm far from an entertainment lawyer, but if you ever need a second set of eyes on something or have any questions regarding unnecessarily confusing legal jargon, please let me know.
 

lawsandguns

uber Member
Forum Supporter
#5
Also, if any of you feel inspired by Jimmy's generosity and want to contribute something to the Boy Scout auction, please let me know.
 

jseymour

Obsessed Member
#6
Well spend the last night and most of today going over a new contract. Now that, that is done time to do a little more work. My schedule to get this done has moved up greatly. I may be completely unavailable for a weeks after april 6th so I am just working on the boy scout knife alone and will finish the others when I am done.

First thing I did was scribe my center lines with a .015 gap for the cutting edge. After heat treating I'll grind it to .010 to .080 thick. It will be a real cutter.



Measuring and laying out the where I want the bolsters and where would be the most ideal place to drill for Corby's and pins for the bolsters.







Decide how high of a grind I want the blade to be and weather or not it would look good with a fuller. I'm not sure about the fuller, especially with this time line.



Using my vise as a third hand only I'm putting the blank in the Bruce Bump File Guide. This will allow me to very accurately file in my edge recess area to make sharpening easier.



Using a chainsaw file time to file in the area.



After a little bit of elbow grease it's all done.



Well that's sadly it for today. Time to go.
 

lawsandguns

uber Member
Forum Supporter
#7
I really didn't appreciate how much time and effort went into one of your knives. It makes it that much more incredible of an item. That being said, don't overexert yourself trying to get it finished. I imagine you have a lot going on and if it isn't ready for this year, we will get by.
 

jseymour

Obsessed Member
#8
I really didn't appreciate how much time and effort went into one of your knives. It makes it that much more incredible of an item. That being said, don't overexert yourself trying to get it finished. I imagine you have a lot going on and if it isn't ready for this year, we will get by.
thank you lawsandguns for being understanding but I committed to this and will see it through.
 

jseymour

Obsessed Member
#9
Today I milled a flat on the copper bolsters. A machined surface makes for a really great fit up.



Then I machined the face that will meet the copper.



It's hard to hold both pieces together and photograph at the same time. But this makes for a great fit up. I'll have to do this again tomorrow. I want to glue the copper liners to the ironwood. Last time I didn't they got bent and I had to replace the copper. This way their will be less waste and rework.

 

jseymour

Obsessed Member
#10
Got in a little more work today before taking off for my other job. First I laid out and cut the copper liners for the ironwood handles.



That was probably about as easy as this project is going to be.



Next I found an old Ironwood handle for a knife that got thrown away. Since I can't reuse the handle it makes the perfect donor material for the handle of the ferro rod. Ironwood and copper as well.



Drilling the blank with my carbide 1/8" drill bit eats the annealed O1 tool steel blade like its hot butter.



Here all the holes are drilled out and chamfered. Lots of ironwood in this one.



I'm at the shop for a full day tomorrow so the blade will get rough ground, tang tapered, heat treated in the salt pot, and all the liners and handle material acraglass together.
 

jseymour

Obsessed Member
#11
Was able to put a full days work on this one today. I found a hidden piece of copper that was a full 3/8 thick and lined up with scales much better so I cut a new piece and machined that first thing this morning.



I then rough ground the blade. Sorry forgot to take pictures. I was on a roll and had it done before I even realized it. So I picked up tapering the tang.

This is a clean surface grinder attachment.



This is how it looks after grinding all that steel and their as least as much kicked out against my wall.



And all done. Nice and tapered. This puts the balance point of the blade right at the front index finger making for a great feeling knife.



This glue needs no introduction to the gunsmiths on this board. Though theirs maybe cleaner.



All the liners are now glued on.



And lastly the blade was first heat treated to get the finest carbide grain, then triple normalized and heat treated normally in the salt pots.

 

jseymour

Obsessed Member
#12
trueing up the plunge lines today. Using the Bruce Bump carbide file guide it's easy to get the plunge lines exact on each side and true.



If you pick up a knife and look at it edgewise at the plunge line you can see how well they did getting each side just right. This is why this jig is invaluable for creating great plunge lines.

 

jseymour

Obsessed Member
#14
time for some more updates. So the blade warped during heat treat. I missed the low temp pot during the transfer and banged it on the steel pot. That could be what caused or something else. Since the only time I have had a blade warp since using salt pots is when I banged it on something during the transfer I think that was probably it.



So I warm the blade up in my toaster oven to 400 degrees for an additional temper. Should give the blade a final RC of 58.



And while it's still hot gently bend it back straight. Pucker factor was high on this I'm not going to lie, and you hope you don't hear a ping from the metal breaking. It got it pretty close. I heated the handle up with a torch after this and flattened it on the anvil keeping the blade nice and cool.



The its off to the tapered tang drill attachment. Here I'm drilling the 3/8" thick copper bolsters onto the handle. Before breaking off one drill bit in the gummy copper.



I super glue the bolsters on and put a pin in the holes as soon as it's drilled so it can't move.



it only takes a few drops of glue. To much and you'll have to heat it up to get the bolsters off.



Doing the other side.



Bolsters are drilled. Tomorrow I need to put my milling vise back on. Square up the copper mating to the ironwood. Square up the iron wood to the bolsters and repeat the drilling process on the handles.

 

jseymour

Obsessed Member
#15
Yesterday I started to true up the bolsters. Now that the holes were drilled I need them to be the same width. on the blade side and handle side.



Blade side was completed before my on/off switch on my mill went out.



what a mess. Good news grizzly has a new one. Bad news it's so expensive I have to wait to till Thursday to order it and then wait the 3 to 5 days shipping before it gets here. I really don't think the knife will be ready for auction now that I have been delayed 10 to 13 days over a switch.

I'll try to hot wire it. I'm headed out to buy a toggle switch or something to get it running till the right part gets here.
 

jseymour

Obsessed Member
#16
Found out the mill comes with a spare switch. I threw the new switch in today and was hoping to have the mill up and running. The switch works but the contactor wont stay in. So you have to hold the run button for it to work, until it burns out as well.



One step forward, two steps back.
 

jseymour

Obsessed Member
#17
So the spare switch is actually for 230v. So when I push the go button you have to hold it in. So a stick I use for glue will fill the bill until payday when I can go buy a proper switch.



Several others who have the same mill have completely replaced their switch with custom jobs and sent me photo's of their work and how they wired it. I'm going to go that route.

Square up one side.



Squared up the ironwood.



going extremely slow on the ironwood burl. Any burl wood for that matter chips out easily.
 

jseymour

Obsessed Member
#18
Today was all about get the grinders set up for tomorrow. I can put in a full day tomorrow so I am just getting everything set up for that.

The grinder currently has a 36" diameter grinding platen on it. I need to set it up with the flat platen.



I have three custom built platen's for this grinder. A flat D2 platen. A 36" A2 platen, and a 48" A2 platen. Made by Nathan Carothers. He also built the water cooled heat sink for the platens.



Today was all about changing the platens and getting them all squared away.





After several tries and getting it close I finally got it.



Now to square up the other axis.



Then squaring up the 1X2X3 block to the platen and not the work rest. The C-clamps are only tight enough to hold it since I don't have enough hands to hold everything.



Then tilt the table to require 45 degrees for the bevels.

 

jseymour

Obsessed Member
#20
progressed a little further today. Got the new electrical housing for the bad switch on the end mill, and am going to use a regular light switch for the forward/reverse control. A DPDT toggle switch for the on/off function.

I like to line everything up and make a quick mark on the sides with a sharpie to ensure I don't get which side I need to 45 wrong. That will ruin your day. Guess how I know?



Using my 2X72 belt sander I rough in the bevels.

http://s117.photobucket.com/user/jimmy79382/media/IMG_1144_zpsag4jy8kb.jpg.html

Do that several times and you get this.



For some reason my sanding belt is bowing out in the middle. I'm not sure what is out of alignment so I'm going to finish them on a disc sander to ensure they are perfect. Install a new sanding disc and away we go.



Rough fit up just held together by hand. You may notice a gap in the bolsters and the handle. I couldn't get the exact same angel and am off a degree or less but you can see it barely. I'll need to get some steel to make a doubler plate tomorrow to disc sand the copper and they should come out pretty good tomorrow.



Putting the two copper bolsters together to check that they come together at the same point. I'll do this several times tomorrow until I can't get them any closer at all. The bottom is slightly longer than the other right now.