Gun Confusion

Mr. B

Obsessed Member
#1
A friend (Army vet and USMA graduate) recently posted a graphic from Marine Corps Online with a picture of an "Inglis" Browning 1935/Hi-Power with "like and share if you've fired one of these", he and several others on his feed mistook it for a 1911A1 - as did the vast majority of those posting on the Marine Corps Online FB thread.

If so many vets can confuse a 1911 with a Hi-Power, is it any wonder that some vets are publicly confusing an AR-15 with an M-16 or M-4?
 
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brokenhalo11

Member
Forum Supporter
#2
Magazine ... Clip. Not everyone is spot on all the time, we all make mistakes.

Mine will probably be posting a reply in this thread. Like to see said picture though.
 

Mr. B

Obsessed Member
#4
browning 1935.jpg

Seems that it was posted with the intent of having "old school" vets who had been issued a 1911/1911A1 respond.

Many "Yes" responses were about "I qualified with that back in..." and then stories about the 1911/1911A1.
 

Ramone

Obsessed Member
#5
Did anyone finally speak and clarify that the pistol in the picture is a Hi Power? The difference between the two pistols is not a firearms enigma. I would expect anyone who professes to know something about pistols to get it.

Thanks for the photo above. It is a great old pistol. It is still useful to someone who wants to work with its quirks (magazine disconnect, heavy trigger, running hardball only, dinky frame safety, hammer bite, and really old school sights).
 

NYECOGunsmith

Obsessed Member
Staff member
Moderator
#6
Heavy trigger is easily remedied on a High Power, just remove the magazine disconnector and you are half way (or more) there.

The trigger pull improves drastically, then polish the sliding surfaces of sear and trigger(no metal removal , no altering of geometry, just a high polish) and you are done.

As for running hardball only, mine runs pretty much anything reliably, and it's a WWII Canadian Inglis.

On most High Powers, it just requires a bit of work on the feed ramp to get it to feed hollow points, going to a Mec Gar magazine helps too, as the angle at which the Mec Gar follower presents the round to the chamber is a bit steeper, so it doesn't have so hard a time getting up the ramp. The projectile's nose hits the ramp further up towards the chamber, doesn't tend to hang up when that happens.

The older HPs had a bit of a hump at the bottom of the feed ramp, careful reshaping of this will allow the Hollow Points to get by easily, as will a good polish on the feed ramp.
Or just install a Bar Sto after market barrel designed for feeding more than just ball ammo.

With the older ones, even unaltered barrels, I have found I can often get them to feed hollow points without modification if I load them to the same overall length as the 115 grain FMJ ball ammo.

The safety can be swapped out for one a bit larger, and the sights can be altered also , although I have left my Inglis with the original sights, milled out of the slide , they would be hard to knock out of alignment or break off, and they shoot POA/POI for almost all the ammo I run through it.

Hammer bite can be addressed with learning to grip the gun properly for some folks , for others with larger or meatier hands, building up a beavertail on the frame is the solution.

Great guns, my Inglis was issued to me, and when I retired 31 years later, Uncle Sam gave it to me as a retirement gift, it's on its 5th barrel, and I have lost count of how many rounds it has fired, but has to be close to , maybe over, 100K now.
It has had a lot of use, no signs of frame cracking, slide cracking or any other wear and tear issue I can see.

The original baked lacquer finish could stand to be re done, but just like its owner and his white hair, the wear and tear were acquired honestly, so I think I will leave it as is.
 

Fogie

Swimming Pool Monkey
Forum Supporter
#7
Heavy trigger is easily remedied on a High Power, just remove the magazine disconnector and you are half way (or more) there.

The trigger pull improves drastically, then polish the sliding surfaces of sear and trigger(no metal removal , no altering of geometry, just a high polish) and you are done.

As for running hardball only, mine runs pretty much anything reliably, and it's a WWII Canadian Inglis.

On most High Powers, it just requires a bit of work on the feed ramp to get it to feed hollow points, going to a Mec Gar magazine helps too, as the angle at which the Mec Gar follower presents the round to the chamber is a bit steeper, so it doesn't have so hard a time getting up the ramp. The projectile's nose hits the ramp further up towards the chamber, doesn't tend to hang up when that happens.

The older HPs had a bit of a hump at the bottom of the feed ramp, careful reshaping of this will allow the Hollow Points to get by easily, as will a good polish on the feed ramp.
Or just install a Bar Sto after market barrel designed for feeding more than just ball ammo.

With the older ones, even unaltered barrels, I have found I can often get them to feed hollow points without modification if I load them to the same overall length as the 115 grain FMJ ball ammo.

The safety can be swapped out for one a bit larger, and the sights can be altered also , although I have left my Inglis with the original sights, milled out of the slide , they would be hard to knock out of alignment or break off, and they shoot POA/POI for almost all the ammo I run through it.

Hammer bite can be addressed with learning to grip the gun properly for some folks , for others with larger or meatier hands, building up a beavertail on the frame is the solution.

Great guns, my Inglis was issued to me, and when I retired 31 years later, Uncle Sam gave it to me as a retirement gift, it's on its 5th barrel, and I have lost count of how many rounds it has fired, but has to be close to , maybe over, 100K now.
It has had a lot of use, no signs of frame cracking, slide cracking or any other wear and tear issue I can see.

The original baked lacquer finish could stand to be re done, but just like its owner and his white hair, the wear and tear were acquired honestly, so I think I will leave it as is.
Mine has always ran like a champ. I bought half a case of the old Federal Nyclad hollowpoints for it years ago and it likes em'. According to FBI statistics, they are real performers. I've shot a lot of FMJ and a variety of HPs through it..I carry the Federals. Never any +Ps.
My only complaint would be the small and not so crisp safety.
It's lack of a beavertail is ldeal for in my pants..I know that hammer bite is real, but not for me cause I'm scrawny.
Don Williams has it now. He's doing a whole shebang on it, including one of his safeties, sights, de-horning and smoothing, reliability and trigger jobs, hammer and sear..on and on. Should be sweeeet! I can't wait to get it back, but wouldn't expect or want him to hurry. It's my Winter gun, anyway.
BTW..John Browning said the HP is the gun that the 1911 should have been.
 
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NYECOGunsmith

Obsessed Member
Staff member
Moderator
#8
I've heard that quote attributed to Browning about the High Power, but since he died in 1926, and the gun's design was finished in 1934, and is largely the work of Dieudonne Saive, and is a pretty far removed product from the design Browning patented in 1923, I suspect he might not have actually said that. Both guns have their advantages and disadvantages, and having carried both in combat, neither ever let me down but given the choice the 1911 in .45 ACP comes first, the 9mm tends to over penetrate and not stop a body nearly as fast as the .45 ACP does, at least in my experience.
 

Fogie

Swimming Pool Monkey
Forum Supporter
#9
I've heard that quote attributed to Browning about the High Power, but since he died in 1926, and the gun's design was finished in 1934, and is largely the work of Dieudonne Saive, and is a pretty far removed product from the design Browning patented in 1923, I suspect he might not have actually said that. Both guns have their advantages and disadvantages, and having carried both in combat, neither ever let me down but given the choice the 1911 in .45 ACP comes first, the 9mm tends to over penetrate and not stop a body nearly as fast as the .45 ACP does, at least in my experience.
Man!...You know a lot!
 

NYECOGunsmith

Obsessed Member
Staff member
Moderator
#10
When 9 trillion plus years old (according to Gullwing anyway!) you are, a lot you will know too! Lived with, worked on, fought with guns almost all my life, and I like history, so when I worked on a gun I tried to learn something of its history, designers, etc.
Sometimes, learning something about the person who designed or invented an object lets you get a better perspective on what they were thinking at the time and then you can figure out what's wrong with it a lot easier.
 

Gullwing

1911 pistolsmith
Staff member
Moderator
#11
Friend of mine loves Hi Powers and has had many many over the years. ~year ago I picked up a Belgian Browning for him. Refinished it for him (didn't really want to but did) and did some trigger work on it. Got it down to ~4-4.5 pounds.
"Nicest trigger he has ever had on a Hi Power".
He didn't like the long hammer so I cut it down too, harder to pull back, but it works until the round hammer and extended safety get back in stock.
Actually worked on it today. Having issues some times when the hammer is pulled back manually the safety goes on. Got it a bit better, but not completely fixed.
 
#12
Did anyone finally speak and clarify that the pistol in the picture is a Hi Power? The difference between the two pistols is not a firearms enigma. I would expect anyone who professes to know something about pistols to get it.
I ID-ed it as a Hi-Power/model 1935 in my friend's feed, had a few people scoff at the idea it wasn't a 1911, then had a few chime in in support, including one who pointed out that it was not only a Hi-Power, but an Inglis, bit others simply ignored that.

Seems to be how the Marine page worked, as well.
 

Gullwing

1911 pistolsmith
Staff member
Moderator
#13
I ID-ed it as a Hi-Power/model 1935 in my friend's feed, had a few people scoff at the idea it wasn't a 1911, then had a few chime in in support, including one who pointed out that it was not only a Hi-Power, but an Inglis, bit others simply ignored that.

Seems to be how the Marine page worked, as well.
Post up a few pictures of crayons to make them feel better. :LOL: