How To Inspect A Used Metal Lathe or Vertical Milling Machine Before Buying

NYECOGunsmith

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#21
Mostly small tools, screwdriver bits really and random small stuff. I don't see myself making something exceeding 10 inches in length. I just don't have the room to have a larger lathe since I still have to get a mini mill
Ahh, ok , it will be fine for things like that, you can do milling on a lathe, even a small one, with the right attachment.

By the way, the tips of the screw drivers should be hollow ground, get a good grinder to go with the lathe, but keep it a good distance from the lathe and mill, and keep them covered with a plastic drop cloth when you use the grinder, the abrasive dust travels some amazing distances and is real hard on the ways on both a lathe and a mill. Wear a respirator too, it's also hard on lungs.
 

Pcmaker

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#22
Ahh, ok , it will be fine for things like that, you can do milling on a lathe, even a small one, with the right attachment.

By the way, the tips of the screw drivers should be hollow ground, get a good grinder to go with the lathe, but keep it a good distance from the lathe and mill, and keep them covered with a plastic drop cloth when you use the grinder, the abrasive dust travels some amazing distances and is real hard on the ways on both a lathe and a mill. Wear a respirator too, it's also hard on lungs.
Can a lathe like I linked be able to work on stainless and other hardened steel? How about chromium vanadium? Ithink most of my bits are made out of this metal.
 

NYECOGunsmith

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#23
Yes, HOWEVER, it will be very slow going, due to the lack of power,you will have to take very shallow cuts in the harder metals, no more than about .005" per pass.
You might get away with .01 " on some stainless steel though, with sharp tooling and getting the feed and speed right.
 

NYECOGunsmith

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#25
No, you won't be able to do that, not enough space between the face of the lathe chuck and the tail stock with a drill chuck mounted in it.

Best you could do would be a hole lengthwise thru about a 5", maybe 6" long bar on a lathe with 12" between centers. And then only as long as the bar is less than 5/8" in diameter so that it will pass thru the spindle.

The lathe chuck will reduce that 12" distance by 2"-4", so with the bar mounted flush with the face of the chuck, you only have 8-10" left of that 12" space, but you still have to mount a chuck on the tail stock ram, and that will soak up another 2" or so, so now you are down to 8" inches left at most for an aircraft length drill bit.

You have to have an extra inch or so beyond the drill bits length in order to load it into the drill chuck, unless you load it in first, then put the workpiece into the chuck.
 

Pcmaker

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#26
That's good enough for me. At least for now. Maybe when I win the lottery, I'll get me a bigger house with a bigger garage, then I can buy a much larger lathe.
 

NYECOGunsmith

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#27
That's good enough for me. At least for now. Maybe when I win the lottery, I'll get me a bigger house with a bigger garage, then I can buy a much larger lathe.
Planned out right, a two car garage can hold 2 average sized cars (NOT 1967 Cadillac Fleetwoods!) AND have room for a 12"x36" lathe, which was for years the size that most gunsmiths used for all chores.

You can set it along one side wall, or at the head of the garage, with just a few inches behind the lathe between it and the wall, and 2 feet of clear space on either end and go to town with it.

I know lots of guys who have done just that.
I've also known guys who put down a floor in a spare bedroom, over the carpet using 3/4" MDF, and put a fair sized lathe in the there.

And some who just built a 8x10 garden shed in the back yard, ran power to it, and put the lathe in there.

So don't give up the idea of owning a full sized lathe just yet, there may be a way around it you haven't considered.
 
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NYECOGunsmith

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#29
Manage the space, and get a 12x36 or even as large as 14x40 lathe.

Next time you are gonna head to Pahrump for some reason (who in their right mind goes to Pahrump?!) gimme a yell and stop by and look at my shop, my lathe is a 14x40 and my mill is a 9x49 Bridgeport style, you will see how little space they actually take up.

One side of a 2 car garage is plenty of room for the two I have above if you position them correctly.
 

Pcmaker

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#30
I might take you up on your offer. I've only been to Pahrump once... to buy a pair of groove joint pliers that I like that the other Home Depots were sold out on and Milwaukee discontinued. My co worker lives there. Drives to Vegas for work every day. Must be a big pain in the butt.
 

NYECOGunsmith

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#31
Not that bad a drive, about 50 minutes or so from the southern edge of Pahrump to I 15 when there is no accident in the way, or morning commute traffic.

Pick a day well in advance, and I will see if I can round up Geo, Lone Rider, Top Hog, Dusty, Irish Mike and the other Pahrumpalopes/Pahrumpoids for lunch after your tour.

We'll stick one of them with the bill!
 

NYECOGunsmith

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#33
I predict a rise in your electrical bill in the near future,.............and rolling blackouts in your neighborhood when you are turning barrels and such.

Biggest lathe I ever saw had an operator cabin on the saddle, the operator cabin was air conditioned and there was a 250 HP diesel engine that turned the lead screw that the cab rode on, and a 25,000 HP electric motor that turned the spindle and it would handle a piece of steel up to 25 feet in diameter by 170 feet long.
 

Gullwing

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#34
I predict a rise in your electrical bill in the near future,.............and rolling blackouts in your neighborhood when you are turning barrels and such.

Biggest lathe I ever saw had an operator cabin on the saddle, the operator cabin was air conditioned and there was a 250 HP diesel engine that turned the lead screw that the cab rode on, and a 25,000 HP electric motor that turned the spindle and it would handle a piece of steel up to 25 feet in diameter by 170 feet long.
and you built is just to prove it to Tophog that you could. Just another Nyeco $25 bet.
 

NYECOGunsmith

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#35
Tophog hadn't invented money yet, so the bet was for 25 teradactyl eggs. Loser had to get them and make the omelet.

Afterwards we used the lathe to turn the front and rear rollers for the Flintstone mobile out of granite we, uh, " borrowed" from Mr. Slate' s quarry.