Index of NYECOGunsmith's How To threads

jfrey123

I aim to misbehave...
Staff member
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#3
:worship: All hail NYECOGunsmith!!!


(oh, and Pachinko Pistola for putting them in one place!)
 

Cujo

FFI CCI
Forum Supporter
#4
Steve's brain might weigh the same as mine. . .but you always hear the story that it's about "quality" and not "quantity."

Someday I look forward to having a conversation w/ the gentleman. I'm halfway through all of my old college physics, diff eq, chemistry, and math books.

Guys, let's face it, Steve has his **** together.
 

Cujo

FFI CCI
Forum Supporter
#6
If I had a portion of Steve's brain, I'd be a genius. No kidding.

Rubik's cube? No problem.

From our talkings, he is the most humble Gentleman and does a lot of volunteer work.

Maybe I'll be up to challenge him to a game of chess. . .I'll swipe pieces when he's not looking. You didn't hear it from me.

Many people here can learn a lot from this man. . .
 
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stoneez

Obsessed Member
Forum Supporter
#7
I will admit, when EVER I make a post asking how to do something, Steve is the person I hope answers.

If we were all game shows, we would most likely be Jeapordy. (not to shabby right?)

Ya, NYECOGunsmith would be "Win Ben Steins Money". (the only game show that ever make me feel retarded)

I look forward to the day I might be able to bye him a cup of coffee and just listen for a while.
 

Tophog

Biker Trailer Trash
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#8
As long as you don't mind driving a little to drop in on us po' folk here in Pahrump, I'm sure Steve's up for a cup of coffee. But he's our Answer Guy, so we share hesitantly! :001_smile:
 

rat907

Guest
#9
Maybe I'll be up to challenge him to a game of chess. . .I'll swipe pieces when he's not looking. You didn't hear it from me.
The man might possess a photographic (not pornographic) mind, do you think that would work?, Me thinks not.

I myself have a mind like a steel trap... rusted, broken and discarded in the south forty.
 

NYECOGunsmith

Obsessed Member
Staff member
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#11
The man might possess a photographic (not pornographic) mind, do you think that would work?, Me thinks not.

I myself have a mind like a steel trap... rusted, broken and discarded in the south forty.
Baaah, don't believe him guys, five minutes spent talking to Rat and you quickly figure out that he's sharp, he just likes to hide it so he can talk you into gun deals that favor him! He's one of those cagey country boys.
 

NYECOGunsmith

Obsessed Member
Staff member
Moderator
#12
Another one for the list:

More Gunsmith's Math


Guaranteed (Well, guaranteed until my tail lights are out of sight anyway) to cure insomnia, boils, boll weevils, bursitis, sinusitis, rabies, scabies, bats, athlete's foot, hemorrhoids, pregnancies, chiggers, democrats, and to drive mothers-in-law screaming out of the house, never to return.

Side effects may include increased fondness for integers, speaking in fractals, increased Fibonacci sequences, constipation, diarrhea,hoof and mouth disease, life, death, and a general feeling of malaise.

Not known to cause cancer, lupus, auto immune disease, sarcoidosis,acidosis,Terwilligers disease or anything else that might interest Dr. House. At least not in humans. In laboratory rat tests, the rats all died of sheer boredom.


Your results may vary.
 

Tophog

Biker Trailer Trash
Staff member
Moderator
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#13
Another one for the list:

More Gunsmith's Math


Guaranteed (Well, guaranteed until my tail lights are out of sight anyway) to cure insomnia, boils, boll weevils, bursitis, sinusitis, rabies, scabies, bats, athlete's foot, hemorrhoids, pregnancies, chiggers, democrats, and to drive mothers-in-law screaming out of the house, never to return.

Side effects may include increased fondness for integers, speaking in fractals, increased Fibonacci sequences, constipation, diarrhea,hoof and mouth disease, life, death, and a general feeling of malaise.

Not known to cause cancer, lupus, auto immune disease, sarcoidosis,acidosis,Terwilligers disease or anything else that might interest Dr. House. At least not in humans. In laboratory rat tests, the rats all died of sheer boredom.


Your results may vary.
You forgot anal leakage! (It usually is included along with death as a side effect in most of the latest TV drug commercials.)
 

NYECOGunsmith

Obsessed Member
Staff member
Moderator
#14
You forgot anal leakage! (It usually is included along with death as a side effect in most of the latest TV drug commercials.)
You watch too much TV Bob! Could have lived a long, full, happy life without that bit of TV knowledge!

Now I gotta develop and patent a leakage tester, and take over the world.
 

Tophog

Biker Trailer Trash
Staff member
Moderator
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#15
You watch too much TV Bob! Could have lived a long, full, happy life without that bit of TV knowledge!

Now I gotta develop and patent a leakage tester, and take over the world.
Yeah! Due to recent circumstances, I've had WAY TOO MUCH time in front of the boob tube! Maybe I'll take up knitting. :laugh:
 

NYECOGunsmith

Obsessed Member
Staff member
Moderator
#16
Yeah! Due to recent circumstances, I've had WAY TOO MUCH time in front of the boob tube! Maybe I'll take up knitting. :laugh:
I understand that out here in desert, underwater match lighting and zero gravity basket weaving are popular hobbies, you might want to consider those.

But if you've got your heart set on knitting sweaters made from prairie dog fur, more power to ya!
 

Tophog

Biker Trailer Trash
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#17
But if you've got your heart set on knitting sweaters made from prairie dog fur, more power to ya!
Actually, I'm considering gopher, since they are so plentiful here. But the dang fur is so short, it's gonna take a passel of 'em!
 

NYECOGunsmith

Obsessed Member
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#18
Well, that's the purpose of crochet hooks when not being used for crocheting, you lay by the gopher hole and when they pop up, you spear them with the crochet hook.

The hook keeps them from sliding off and back into their holes!
Took me years to finger that out, I lost a lot of gophers trying to spear them with the knitting needles!
 

Bulleteater

Big Stick policy
Forum Supporter
#19
How to determine a proper fitting skeet gun

NyeCoYoda PM'd some tips on how to determine if a skeet gun is the right fit for me. And I took the liberty of pasting his very detailed reply below. Excellent info! In fact it might be a good idea to start a thread devoted to skeet gun fitting and have Pachinko update the OP with a link.

Enjoy!...

NYECOGunsmith writes:

How to determine a proper fitting skeet gun
First check the length of pull. Quick "field" check for this is to place the UNLOADED!! shotgun in the crook of the arm that you pull the trigger with. Right handed? Use the right arm, etc. With your forearm parallel to the ground, and your bicep 90° perpendicular to the ground, lay the stock on your forearm so that the but stock is up against the bicep, now extend your trigger finger and curl it as though you were going to fire the gun.

Does the first distal pad of your index finger meet the center of the trigger?

If it does, the LOP (length of pull) is OK for you. If it doesn't reach that far, the gun is too long and you will probably shoot high with it,a and the buttstock will kick a bit.

IF it goes beyond that point, the stock is too short, it's going to kick the crap out of your cheek and your shoulder (cheek piece and buttstock will BOTH smack you in this case).

Next, if the gun has a mid point bead (two beads, one at the muzzle, one at the middle of the barrel called the mid point bead) with the gun UNLOADED and your eyes closed, throw the gun to your shoulder and without adjusting its position in any way, open your eyes.

Do you see two beads, or just one? Just one is perfect, the gun will shoot point of aim/point of impact for you. If you see two beads, is the front bead above or below the middle bead?

Above it means the gun will shoot high, this is the way a Trap gun is normally set up for most shooters.
If the middle bead is higher than the front bead, the gun is going to shoot low, and kick the hell out of you as the stock rises to your face. Do the above test a dozen times to get an average feel for where it will shoot for you.

Shooting it at a patterning board (CCSP has one on range #1, shotgun park) will confirm this.

Next, you need another person to help you. With the gun UNLOADED, and checked to be as such by EVERYONE PRESENT!! NO MISTAKES HERE! you throw the gun to your shoulder with eyes closed as above, and have a second person at the muzzle look down the barrel with YOUR eyes still closed.

They are looking to see if you are shouldering the gun canted (twisted to one side or the other from a perfect vertical orientation) , then, with you holding it still, they tell you to open your eyes.

They should see the bead(s) in perfect alignment with the center of whichever eye is behind the barrel(s)/receiver. If not, you will be making unconscious adjustments to it while trying to swing the gun on the bird. The pitch, cast, and drop all affect this.

No gun will ever be always perfect for you, because the thickness of your clothes with alter this, so will you losing or gaining weight.

But these things should all be close to right on most of the time, given slight variations in your attire and weight.

The gun's balance point should be between the hands, some folks ( I am one) like it a little closer towards the hand on the forearm. I like a muzzle heavy shotgun, helps to keep you from stopping your swing to fast. But if you don't have a lot of upper body strength, towards the hand on the pistol grip of the stock will be preferred, as it is closer to the body and will help you to control the weight, swing and recoil of the gun better in this position.

That's about it, other than the fits of the cheek piece so that it is comfortable and doesn't cut or smack the cheekbone, and lets you get a consistent cheek and should weld every time you mount the gun.

Lastly, shooting it at a patterning board will tell you how your point of aim relates to where the gun is going to throw its pattern, and of course, how it actually patterns with various loads of shot, chokes,etc.

If you consistently miss birds below them, the gun shoots low for you, and this must be corrected by stock alterations.
Conversely, shooting over the birds means the gun shoots high, this is easy to accommodate, just hold under the birds.

With my Browning Cynergy, I set it up to shoot high like a trap gun, I like my targets to always be completely visible.

Next question?
 

NYECOGunsmith

Obsessed Member
Staff member
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#20
Actually, the above are the basics of fitting ANY shotgun to the shooter, not just a shotgun dedicated to the sport of Skeet shooting.

There are guns set up just for Skeet, just as there are those set up just for Trap, but the basics apply to any shotgun that will be used for wing shooting or for the use of slugs and buckshot as well.

This is because a shotgun's rear sight is the eye of the shooter, the eye that is inline with the center line of the barrel or barrels.

Having said that, to be effective (not accurate, that really doesn't apply to a shotgun unless you are shooting only slugs) the gun has to come to the same point on the shoulder and the cheek every time it is mounted.

These "welds" as they are called, the "Cheek Weld" and the "Shoulder Weld", have to be the same time after time, so that the rear sight, the shooter's eye, comes to the same place every time with regard to the muzzle of the gun, not the front bead!

Placement of the hands on the forearm and grip areas is involved in getting the right "sight" picture, but is not so critical as the two welds are.

Shotguns are pointed, not aimed (unless you are using slugs that is) but we still have to point them in the right place/direction.

The front (and if present) mid point beads are there solely to let the shooter judge the relationship (lead) between the muzzle and the target during the early stages of learning to be a good wing shot.

Once the mind has made the connection between lead and target for various angles, target sizes, target speeds and distances, the beads can disappear and the shooter's ability to hit a moving target will not change due to the loss of them.

SKEET GUNS

Dedicated Skeet guns frequently are set up to shoot point of aim, point of impact coinciding.

Most Skeet shooters seem to prefer this set up as it allows them to cover the bird, move out in front of it to the correct lead, and fire. This way, they don't have to worry about being over or under the bird. But it can make figuring out lead a bit slower of a process for a new shooter.

Dedicated Skeet guns also frequently feature fixed chokes, both choked for a 0.005" constriction, the one called "Skeet".

And most dedicated Skeet guns seem to follow the old tradition of being light, fast handling and having short barrels, barrels in the 24" to 28" range, although I have seen some as short as 20".

The old idea was "short and light swings fast"..........I have never subscribed to that idea.

All my Skeet guns always have had long, heavy barrels. Light and fast swings fast, true, but it also STOPS FAST! And stopping your swing means a missed bird.

Shooters of small stature and lacking in upper body strength may find the light, fast gun an advantage, if they learn to keep it moving, but then they encounter the other problem with a gun set up this way, recoil.

A light, fast gun, in 12 gauge, 20, 28 gauge, or even .410 bore, and even if fitted to the shooter, can provide enough recoil to the shooter to make anything more than a couple of 25 bird rounds uncomfortable.

These shooters can't be truly competitive, because just a few rounds back to back starts them down the path to flinches, and misses because their fast swing starts to degrade.

A heavier shotgun (My Browning Cynergy with 30 inch barrels weighs just under 10 pounds for example, and is considered very heavy for a O/U Skeet gun, most of which rarely top 7 pounds) will absorb a good deal of that recoil, and since it (My Cynergy I mean) is muzzle heavy, it helps to keep the barrels moving once they start tracking the bird.

If 32" barrels had been available when I bought it (they now are) I would have ordered it set up with those.

The Skeet fraternity is just now starting to see the advantage in longer, heavier barrels, and maybe someday they all will understand it.

They are also beginning to see the advantage of setting these guns up to shoot a bit high, as a trap gun does, so that the bird can always be in sight. This makes it much easier to hit a bird that is jinking around, as they do on a really windy day.

TRAP GUNS

Trap guns generally have a long barrel, most start at 30" and go 32" or 34" in dedicated single barrel and O/U trap guns.

These guns, if they are fixed choke, will usually have a Modified choke in them, which will allow for decent scores on the trap range back to the 20 yard mark, a bit further if the shooter is fast getting on the bird.

If they are set up for an advanced shooter, they may have screw in chokes, or a fixed Full choke, which will allow the advanced shooter to handle birds all the way from the 16 yard line back to the 27 yard handicap line. And if the gun is a double barrel, one may be fixed (or screw in) at Full, the other at Extra full, to allow the gun to be used for either Doubles Trap or Bunker Trap/ International.

Trap guns are also generally set up to shoot high, as the birds are rising in front of the shooter, and if they were set up for a point of aim / point of impact coincidence, it would be more difficult to determine the proper lead.

The longer barrels yield better (more even) pattern densities with whatever choke is in them, and the weight contributes to a smooth swing.

Where a Skeet shooter may only fire 4 rounds in a given day /match, trap shooters often shoot far more than that, and the weight helps with recoil management, reducing shooter fatigue and error.

That's just some of the basics behind why shotguns are set up the way they commonly are for the various games.