interesting factoid on airweight.

#1
My wife now has a ccw & opted for a S&W J frame airweight, because, as U no doubt guess, it weighs nothing. Problem is, at range to practice, recoil is greater than she finds acceptable (kindly worded) even w/ standard 38 spl. She couldn't blast a box of 50. There is no such thing as a free lunch.
 

Gullwing

1911 pistolsmith
Staff member
Moderator
#2
Try different grips. I had a 357 that would kill you before 5 shots, new grips and my mom had no problem with a box.
 
#3
The laws of physics will NOT be denied.


I have a S&W Airweight 38 special snubby with the shrouded hammer, used to carry a lot before I got a Ruger LC9S Pro.

Everything you said is spot on.

I put a couple of hundred rounds through it for practice, but it was never very enjoyable.
 

NYECOGunsmith

Obsessed Member
Staff member
Moderator
#4
Finding the right set of grips for these micro weight hand cannons is of paramount importance.
The right grips can alter how all the recoil is perceived, taking what was a sharp, painful sting with the factory grips and making it a still strong thump spread over a larger portion of the hand, and changing the point in the grasp of the gun that the pistol rotates around can make a difference too.

Getting it to be "comfortable" to shoot for 50, 100 or XXX round may not be possible for all hand sizes , grip types , guns, shooters, loads, etc. as there are a lot of variables in that formula, but you can usually find one combination of the above that is the most workable so that a sufficient amount of practice can be obtained without inducing a flinch, or causing pain or damage to the shooter's hand.
 
#5
Finding the right set of grips for these micro weight hand cannons is of paramount importance.
The right grips can alter how all the recoil is perceived, taking what was a sharp, painful sting with the factory grips and making it a still strong thump spread over a larger portion of the hand, and changing the point in the grasp of the gun that the pistol rotates around can make a difference too.

Getting it to be "comfortable" to shoot for 50, 100 or XXX round may not be possible for all hand sizes , grip types , guns, shooters, loads, etc. as there are a lot of variables in that formula, but you can usually find one combination of the above that is the most workable so that a sufficient amount of practice can be obtained without inducing a flinch, or causing pain or damage to the shooter's hand.
Thanks, good advice.