Load development ...




rw blakemore

Member
Forum Supporter
#1
Is anyone using analytical tools and barrel node theory to determine best loads for a given powder, bullet, and optimum muzzle velocities?

How about fine tuning loads by changing bullet seating depth, case neck tension, and neck hardness?

If you are, or are interested in using any of these I'd enjoy hearing from you.
 

TexasJackKin

Breathng Free, at last
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#2
I just responded to your "new member" introduction post. The use of analytical tools has always interested me. I tend to work toward finding barrel harmonic nodes, and less toward velocity nodes. Although I understand, that at extreme ranges, both are important.

For handguns (the majority of my reloading) I'm more interested in Reliability and clean burning.....
 

rw blakemore

Member
Forum Supporter
#3
I just responded to your "new member" introduction post. The use of analytical tools has always interested me. I tend to work toward finding barrel harmonic nodes, and less toward velocity nodes. Although I understand, that at extreme ranges, both are important.

For handguns (the majority of my reloading) I'm more interested in Reliability and clean burning.....
 

rw blakemore

Member
Forum Supporter
#4
Feel free to contact me if you have any questions.

I seldom run any factory ammo in any of my rifles or pistols. I have a lot experience with and data for 223 Rem, 6.5 Creedmoor, 308 Win, 300 Win Mag, and 9mm, 38, 357, 45ACP, 45GAP, and 44 Mag handguns.

Evan at the most elementary levels, reloading offers many advantages over factory ammo. Bolt guns, semi-auto rifles and pistols, and revolvers all perform better with optimized hand loads. Reloading also saves money and helps one get through those tough times when the right powder or bullet isn't available.

Hopefully, we can generate some more enthusium for reloading.
 

titanNV

NRA Endowment Member
Administrator
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#9
Yep, MAC was joking. Sometimes intent of a comment is lost in translation when posted in writing.


For me, I don't shoot enough for reloading to be cheaper, after buying good equipment and tools. But, at least now that I have the tools and components, I don't worry about ammo scares.
 

rw blakemore

Member
Forum Supporter
#11
Good point. Maybe we're talking about different kinds of cost.

If we consider only the cost of "components" (bullet, powder, primer, and a case that is used several times) I think it's fair to say the cost per hand loaded round, for most calibers, is approximately 30% less than factory prices whether you load one or hundred.

Now, if we amortize the cost of equipment used to reload you need to build hundreds, maybe thousands of rounds depending on the caliber, before you save any money.

I assume most people who build handloads shoot thousands of rounds per year.

If not, reloading in order to achieve best precision or to guard against
factory ammo unavailability may be worth the additional cost.
 
#12
6.5CM
~$0.32-$0.35 140 ELDM
$.05 primer
$.10 brass (over 10 loads)
$0.17 powder
= $0.64 - $0.67

Factory rounds are what $1.50? So less then half the cost, but the price of admission is high. On this Lapua brass I'm going to have to factor in annealing every few loads.
 
#15
Currently, there is so much factory ammunition available at very reasonable prices. It was not that long ago when shortages of ammunition and reloading products (powder and primers) made reloading a more cost-effective option. Personally, I think the best value (cost savings potential) as a reloader is for match grade ammunition. You most likely are not saving much or at all if you reload the cheap stuff, however you already have invested in your equipment and thus have some type of capability.

For reloading 50 BMG, reloading is still very cost effective compared to retail purchase prices. Reloading for rare or unusual calibers is also cost effective.

For me, reloading is not about the cost, it is about maximizing the potential for accuracy as combined with my various weapon projects.
 
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rw blakemore

Member
Forum Supporter
#17
People can pick up a decent reloading kit for less than $500 (excludes 50BMG and a few others). If you shoot 1000 rounds you've added $.50 per round to your cost. Add this to Roach's high quality component cost of $.67 and you've spent $1.17 per round. That's 78% of the $1.50 per round factory 6.5 CM ammo cost and will likely perform better.

It only gets better with the larger calibers.
 

TexasJackKin

Breathng Free, at last
Forum Supporter
#19
I really don't like to be accused of lying.
Is it possible you didn't know what you were doing? (Retoricle question)
Yes, it was a joke, Mac702 is a good guy, with a lot of good insight!

One of the reasons I reload, is once I find a load I like, I can shoot the same load for the next 20 years. If you use factory ammo, not so much, unless you get the same lot numbers. I know for my statement to be 100% accurate, I would need the same lot numbers on all the components used. Although, I don't think that's a big issue. YMMV
 

Gullwing

1911 pistolsmith
Staff member
Moderator
#20
People can pick up a decent reloading kit for less than $500 (excludes 50BMG and a few others). If you shoot 1000 rounds you've added $.50 per round to your cost. Add this to Roach's high quality component cost of $.67 and you've spent $1.17 per round. That's 78% of the $1.50 per round factory 6.5 CM ammo cost and will likely perform better.

It only gets better with the larger calibers.
Right now 9mm $75 for bullets, $30 for primers and about $10 in powder= $115 plus a few hours to put it together.
You can get factory ammo for $140 for 1,000 or even cheaper several places online.
140-115= 25 so it would take 20,000 rounds to cover the $500 in tooling. Time=money so how much is your time worth? (Yes reloading to most is a hobby)
Sure .300 win mag or such would get paid off much quicker.