Model 19-4





#1
Hey guys just wanted to throw this out there in case there is any S&W collectors interested. in sharing your photos and info for educational purposes. Here is a beautiful pristine condition S&W model 19-4 .357 Magnum. It was passed down throughout the years and here it is in my generation.

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4D5

uber Member
#2
That's one fine revolver you have there.
Have you had a chance to shoot it yet?

I have a couple but am unable to post pictures until I choose and alternative to photobucket.
I as many others here, have been bit.
I just got an email from photobucket that I can no longer post third party.
 

SeegarSmoker

Prefers Wheelguns
#6
Nice gun. I have a 19-4 too that I shoot regularly. The model 19 has been known to develop some issues shooting .357 magnum loads but you can shoot .38 special in it the rest of your life and not worry about it. Then your kids and grand kids can continue using it. It ain't likely to wear out. I'd shoot it and enjoy it.
 
#8
Nice gun. I have a 19-4 too that I shoot regularly. The model 19 has been known to develop some issues shooting .357 magnum loads but you can shoot .38 special in it the rest of your life and not worry about it. Then your kids and grand kids can continue using it. It ain't likely to wear out. I'd shoot it and enjoy it.
Correct, some of the .357 K frames have cracked the forcing cone. The bottom of the forcing cone has a flat spot across the bottom of it. Not a problem if you shoot heavier bullets stick with 158 grain bullets and there is no problem. The lighter bullets are traveling faster and hitting the forcing cone harder cracking the cone it is a fairly rare occurrence.
 
#9
Correct, some of the .357 K frames have cracked the forcing cone. The bottom of the forcing cone has a flat spot across the bottom of it. Not a problem if you shoot heavier bullets stick with 158 grain bullets and there is no problem. The lighter bullets are traveling faster and hitting the forcing cone harder cracking the cone it is a fairly rare occurrence.
I have that problem, and need to get it fixed. S&W is no help, don't have barrel in stock, considered unrepairable. Want to get it fixed anyway, anyone have suggestions?
 

Gunhand

Firearms Instructor
#14
Model 19 with a two inch barrel isn't really a Model 19, more of a "want to be 19".
Funny, the suspect my partner shot in 1983 with a model 19 2 1/2 inch didn't seem to think it was a "want to be 19". he went to prison without a spleen and a very bad surgical scar!!
 
#15
Funny, the suspect my partner shot in 1983 with a model 19 2 1/2 inch didn't seem to think it was a "want to be 19". he went to prison without a spleen and a very bad surgical scar!!
.357 cal will get the job done. This is not the question or the subject, regardless of inches. When I bought my model 19 I read an article in a magazine saying that you will never experience the true power of 357 cal with less than 6" because it does not give the exhaust gases enough time to propel the bullet to it's full potential. Yes 2 1/2 inches can kill a man, But like your wife told you, a couple of more inches can make a world of difference. If you are going 2 1/2 inches get your self a 38 cal. If you are talking about the greatest revolver ever made 4" absolute minimum, or get yourself "6" inches and step into the real mans world. HALALUYA!
 
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Gunhand

Firearms Instructor
#16
.357 cal will get the job done. This is not the question or the subject, regardless of inches. When I bought my model 19 I read an article in a magazine saying that you will never experience the true power of 357 cal with less than 6" because it does not give the exhaust gases enough time to propel the bullet to it's full potential. Yes 2 1/2 inches can kill a man, But like your wife told you, a couple of more inches can make a world of difference. If you are going 2 1/2 inches get your self a 38 cal. If you are talking about the greatest revolver ever made 4" absolute minimum, or get yourself "6" inches and step into the real mans world. HALALUYA!
Well seems someone has a case of "barrel envy". of course a longer barrel will allow for more burn time in a revolver. I know that not from a magazine article, but from being a law enforcement firearms instructor since 1980. I also have carried revolvers on duty during my career. And yes you get more velocity out of a six inch barrel, but when you carry a weapon for duty use, there are other considerations. Like the ability to conceal said revolver. A six inch revolver isn't the easiest to conceal compared to a 2 1/2 inch barrel. There is also the consideration of the extra weight of the longer revolver. Carrying that extra weight can wear on a person. it's not like you put in your gun bag and carrying it to the range table. So in defensive pistol world, there are trade-offs, "Bigger" isn't always better.

And the final point you seem to be missing, is that with ANY handgun, it is about bullet placement. You can't make up for poor marksmanship with a bigger caliber or a longer barrel. So while you're playing Inspector Callahan, just remember what your wife told you...It doesn't matter how big your "barrel" is if you can't hit the right spot!
 

Dr. Marneaus

Station Wagon Collector
#17
Model 19 with a two inch barrel isn't really a Model 19, more of a "want to be 19".
Considering Smith and Wesson designates it as a model 19, it is really a model 19.

That being said, your argument that when it comes to short barrels you should just choose .38 is also wrong. Maybe for YOUR needs, there isn’t a useful difference, but a .357 will still greatly out perform a .38spl load in terms of velocity penetration and muzzle energy. Depending on loads, from a 2.5” barrel you still gain from about 200-400fps at the muzzle when firing .357 compared to various .38 loads.
 
#18
Considering Smith and Wesson designates it as a model 19, it is really a model 19.

That being said, your argument that when it comes to short barrels you should just choose .38 is also wrong. Maybe for YOUR needs, there isn’t a useful difference, but a .357 will still greatly out perform a .38spl load in terms of velocity penetration and muzzle energy. Depending on loads, from a 2.5” barrel you still gain from about 200-400fps at the muzzle when firing .357 compared to various .38 loads.
Considering Smith and Wesson designates it as a model 19, it is really a model 19.

That being said, your argument that when it comes to short barrels you should just choose .38 is also wrong. Maybe for YOUR needs, there isn’t a useful difference, but a .357 will still greatly out perform a .38spl load in terms of velocity penetration and muzzle energy. Depending on loads, from a 2.5” barrel you still gain from about 200-400fps at the muzzle when firing .357 compared to various .38 loads.
Newton's Law of Relativity " If you want a big gun, go get a big gun, don't get a big gun and try to make it little!"
 

Dr. Marneaus

Station Wagon Collector
#19
Newton's Law of Relativity " If you want a big gun, go get a big gun, don't get a big gun and try to make it little!"
I’m not gonna argue that, and will perhaps agree, lol, but that’s not what we are discussing.

I will argue that if you want a little gun, there’s no reason not to try and make it a big gun, and gain any advantage you can, whether it’s capacity or energy