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Pistol Weapon Light Location







SixshooterSam

Making Automobiles Great Again
#21
You need GROSS motor skills on a combat weapon. You need to VERY EASILY get your hand in position without having to think about how to get it under the light. Practice and let us know how it goes.
One of the things I practice on occasion when I go out is to get myself out of breath and to the point of muscle failure and weakened central nervous system by running and aggressively pumping some weights with both arms to the point of failure, then immediately grabbing a firearm and engaging one or several targets. It's not the same as being under real life or death stress, but it's the best way I can think of to duplicate it by yourself in the desert. That's when I would test your light positioning, gloves, etc. Your weaknesses in training and such will be exposed, and you'll have a better idea of how quickly you can really grab your weapon and use it effectively under stress. I sometimes time myself when doing this as well, if I set out a series of targets and multiple weapons. But sometimes I do it with just one weapon and am going for accuracy rather than timing.

One thing in particular that this showed me was just how difficult it is to quickly draw your pistol and rack the slide to chamber a round when your fine motor skills are toast due to stress. I wasn't a believer in that until I experienced it myself this way, and I now carry with a round in the chamber as a result. I didn't before.

Another thing that I do sometimes when I do this is to load several magazines with a different number of rounds each, usually only just a few rounds each, then practice rapid fire and multiple quick mag changes. These are things everyone should work on, rather than just assume they'll somehow be fine under stress.
 

Poena238

Rock
Forum Supporter
2020 Supporter
#22
One of the things I practice on occasion when I go out is to get myself out of breath and to the point of muscle failure and weakened central nervous system by running and aggressively pumping some weights with both arms to the point of failure, then immediately grabbing a firearm and engaging one or several targets. It's not the same as being under real life or death stress, but it's the best way I can think of to duplicate it by yourself in the desert. That's when I would test your light positioning, gloves, etc. Your weaknesses in training and such will be exposed, and you'll have a better idea of how quickly you can really grab your weapon and use it effectively under stress. I sometimes time myself when doing this as well, if I set out a series of targets and multiple weapons. But sometimes I do it with just one weapon and am going for accuracy rather than timing.

One thing in particular that this showed me was just how difficult it is to quickly draw your pistol and rack the slide to chamber a round when your fine motor skills are toast due to stress. I wasn't a believer in that until I experienced it myself this way, and I now carry with a round in the chamber as a result. I didn't before.

Another thing that I do sometimes when I do this is to load several magazines with a different number of rounds each, usually only just a few rounds each, then practice rapid fire and multiple quick mag changes. These are things everyone should work on, rather than just assume they'll somehow be fine under stress.
Before I get to that point, for me personally, I need to work on mechanics a bit better.
 
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SixshooterSam

Making Automobiles Great Again
#23
Before I get to that point, for me personally, I need to work on mechanics a bit better. Poor timing with ammo prices being what they are, but my aim and stability isn't crisp.

What I oughta do is find and take a course with instruction, something more personal than typical situational courses that have a dozen or so participants and only one or two instructors, that can break down my mechanics. I concentrate on stance or grip and lose concentration on this or that.. know what I mean? I don't need to be great, but I want to be good. And I want to be prepared, like you've eluded to, but I don't want to half ass it. Not offering that you are, don't consider it that way, I'm speaking about myself personally.
One thing that I found particularly valuable is watching videos and learning from a true professional, like Jerry Miculek. He has made some really excellent videos where he discusses and shows various things to train on, how to properly handle a pistol and rifle, etc.. Really informative without a whole bunch of BS. I learned a lot and did a lot of practicing based on his teachings and made substantial improvements in my own abilities. I'm certainly not on his level, or on the likes of Mac or anyone else that shoots far more often than I do who have real professional training, but I know I'm a lot better than the average knucklehead full of bravado like so many of the douchebags I used to see at shooting ranges at weekends who barely know how to use their firearms at all.

I picked up rifle shooting a lot faster and surpassed most of my friend's abilities quickly, but shooting a pistol well has always been much more work for me. Took a lot more focused practice before I could confidently say I was "good" with a pistol. Again, I'm not a professional and I doubt I would win any competitions against those who do so regularly, but I consider myself to be competent with a pistol.
 

SixshooterSam

Making Automobiles Great Again
#25
I'm going to look into Jerry. I've heard of him and come across a couple videos. I like watching Hickock videos, he's entertaining, but doesn't touch on fundamentals much. It's embarrassing, but I was one of those knuckleheads out shooting my handguns before I really got into it as a hobby..
I can't stand Hickok's rambling, which I think has gotten worse over the years. I stopped watching his videos quite some time ago. He appears to be a damn good shot, but I don't think he's particularly strong on technique, and good technique is what makes it repeatable under stress.
 

Poena238

Rock
Forum Supporter
2020 Supporter
#26
I can't stand Hickok's rambling, which I think has gotten worse over the years. I stopped watching his videos quite some time ago. He appears to be a damn good shot, but I don't think he's particularly strong on technique, and good technique is what makes it repeatable under stress.
I skip through his rambling at times, other times I welcome it. He has a damm good time doing those videos!
 
#28
I can't stand Hickok's rambling, which I think has gotten worse over the years. I stopped watching his videos quite some time ago. He appears to be a damn good shot, but I don't think he's particularly strong on technique, and good technique is what makes it repeatable under stress.

Guys gettn older i ramble at 30 to my self allday long . lol
 
#29
I can't stand Hickok's rambling, which I think has gotten worse over the years. I stopped watching his videos quite some time ago. He appears to be a damn good shot, but I don't think he's particularly strong on technique, and good technique is what makes it repeatable under stress.

Guys gettn older i ramble at 30 to my self allday long . lol