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Piston vs DI?







42tula

uber Member
#21
My advice. Get one of both, and decide which one you like the most. Then sell the second place / other if that makes things easier for you.

I have both and will sell neither. Both work great suppressed and unsuppressed. Both have fantastic accuracy suppressed and unsuppressed. Both are cleaned every range trip / class. To not clean a tool after use is pure laziness.

For the record, no a DI AR is not a piston driven gun.
 
#22
I have been and always will be an AK guy. So piston was an easy choice for me when I finally got a semi-auto for a hog hunter. I spent WAY too much and as of next week my can for it has been at NFA in prison for a year. BUT, I took down 2 hogs with this bad boy in FL last year and it (poop) like heaven.
I actually had friends that would hunt hogs with just dogs and a knife. :oops:

Anyhow, thanks for everyone's opinions.
 
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tdyoung58

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#23
I've got upwards of 3k rounds thru my DI carbine upper, have never cleaned the gas tube or gas block. Only failures I've experienced were cheap magazine follower/spring related.
 

MAC702

LEGEN...wait for it... DARY!
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#25
...I was hoping that a piston AR wouldn't have quite as much blowback as a DI rifle when suppressed, but that proved not to be the case!
Doesn't make much difference for how much comes back from the barrel itself, but an adjustable gas port can help with either system.
 

Saber6

New member
#26
I prefer the bolt on piston kits over a proprietary piston built rifle. Easy to swap back to a DI if it fails. I've been running both AA piston kits for years. In my bug out bag for my piston setup I keep a DI bolt carrier, gas block and tube, and all tools needed to swap parts if necessary. I have only had an issue with a piston failing once. And had a DI fail on my once too but that was the extractor on the bolt, so not really DI fault.
 

DeanD

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#27
I am a FAL fan and love the gas system although I don't currently own one. Technically the piston system is probably "better". Always liked the Daewoo design. That said in 55 years of shooting AR's and M-16's I find no problem with the DI system. I don't find them that difficult to clean and have ran them dirty as hell and they still work. Don't shoot my AR's that much but in Vietnam I probably put a few thousand rounds through an A1 in a single day and never had a malfunction. Just find better uses for my money than the extra cost of a piston AR and I like the simplicity of using all GI parts.
 

grw80

New member
#28
I decided to buy one of the top of the line piston ARs out there after YEARS of battling issues with numerous DI ARs from Colt to Bushmaster to RRA and then finally to the HK 556A1 (huge waste of my money).

After buying the Barrett REC7 and putting this thing through absolute torture and never missing a beat all while being the most accurate AR I’ve ever owned....I won’t ever go back. My next purchase is the REC10 40B3FBA4-DB1C-4997-AAED-F184FA5586DF.jpeg
 

Mr. B

Curmudgeon In Training
#29
From the link



10,000 rounds? Even at $300/1000 you’re looking at $3000 of ammo alone before “failure” out a sample of one gun. If you can afford that much ammo repairing a rifle shouldn’t be an issue. I doubt 99.5% of civilian shooters will put 5,000 rounds through their AR in a lifetime, much less 10,000. Also sample of one. Any one item can break at anytime.



So you don’t follow the manufactures recommended practices for parts replacement and cleaning and then complain when the device breaks? What kind of sense does that make? If the item doesn’t suit your needs because it’s too difficult, unusual, or non-standard to fit your establishes practices, well that’s a perfectly fine reason to not use something. However to try to shoehorn an item into your practices and then complain that it breaks, well that’s on you, not the device.

Also, the problem was apparently not the piston or piston system, but the barrel that came with the gun they bought.

"it started keyholing after only 10,000 rounds. I was SO pissed because I spent all that money on the gun and it couldn't last 10,000 rounds. I had barrels from before we even opened the range with 1,000's of rounds on them from J&T Distributing (chrome-lined) that didn't keyhole well into the 80,000-100,000 range "
 

Mr. B

Curmudgeon In Training
#30
With a gas-piston AR, you can use the less expensive, dirtier burning, Russian ammo with fewer problems.

If you are saving 10 cents a round on ammo, 3,000 rounds is your break even point on spending $300 more for the rifle.

Also worth noting is the fact that gas-piston ARs tend to be made by mid-range and up manufacturers, rather than "bargain basement" manufacturers, so when looking at "extra cost" you may want to price-compare gas-piston ARs to DI ARs from similar manufacturers.
 
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2GoneDE

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#31
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tdyoung58

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#32
How many people do you know with an HK416 (which is THE piston AR)? Top of the line quality and cost. They do not make a civilian version...a pretty select few get one.
One on GunBroker right now for almost 8k
 
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#33
How many people do you know with an HK416 (which is THE piston AR)? Top of the line quality and cost. They do not make a civilian version...a pretty select few get one. Everything is proprietary. No thanks. View attachment 67683
Here is me with my buddy's duty HK416.

m556a1 is the civilian version, obviously not full auto though. They go for around 2.8-3k last time I checked, but I guess that's gone up a few hundred in this crazy time. Too rich for my blood right now, but HK makes nice stuff.
 

Kinoons

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#34
If you want to go the totally opposite direction, I believe the keltec su16 is a piston driven action.
 

Grumpyoldretiredcop

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#36
If you want to go the totally opposite direction, I believe the keltec su16 is a piston driven action.
It is. A lot of folks don't like them because you can't run steel case ammo, and because they're inexpensive, largely polymer and not meant for the world-ending firefight some folks in the firearms world get wet dreams over - and will never see. That being said, my SU16B in desert tan that I owned, and the SU16CA in black that I now own seem to get just as dirty as any DI rifle. Darned if I know why unless they blow back more from the barrel than other designs and being left handed I'd think I would have noticed that.
 

Kinoons

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#37
It is. A lot of folks don't like them because you can't run steel case ammo, and because they're inexpensive, largely polymer and not meant for the world-ending firefight some folks in the firearms world get wet dreams over - and will never see. That being said, my SU16B in desert tan that I owned, and the SU16CA in black that I now own seem to get just as dirty as any DI rifle. Darned if I know why unless they blow back more from the barrel than other designs and being left handed I'd think I would have noticed that.
I haven’t noticed my SU16CA being really dirty, but I’ll also admit it doesn’t get shot very much at all.
 

Grumpyoldretiredcop

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#38
I shot the SU16B a lot, sold it when I left CA. I've probably only run a thousand rounds or so through the SU16CA with no problems. Just picked up a PLR16 and installed a folding SB Tactical brace. It's a very light, compact little package. When the factory compact forend gets here, I'll get it out to the range. It'll be interesting to see if it gets as dirty as the longer barreled SU16CA.