Starter Precision Rifle?





makes since on the trigger if you own several riffles youd want them all the same or as close as you could get them. as far as factory loads go im not sure about the accuracy but i do know several make match ammo that shoots pretty good from what ive read/seen but i also know that the best accuracy is going to come from a hand load built for the riffle.
Yes, there are some pretty good (accurate) loads available "off the shelf", but seeing as how I have a pretty fair investment in reloading tools, enjoy developing loads for my rifles, have been doing it about 35 years and am therefore reasonably adept by now, I tend to go that way as I know it will be (a) CHEAPER and also that (b) I will likely wind up with a load that suits my exact rifle to a "T".

I tend to shoot hundreds upon hundreds of rounds a year (probably more like thousands...) and that can get expensive REAL QUICK if you want only the very best ammo pretty much all the time...
 

Quickdraw

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260 or 308 for long distance? the more I read the less I know...:scared:
You could ask the same question about many different calibers. I guess one question would be how long of a distance? After everything is said and done they are both great calibers with a few differences. Having started on 308 and then moved to a 260 variant (6.5 Creedmoor) I have a healthy respect for both. Going by the migration of long distance shooters from 308 to 260 or now even 6mm caliber bullets I would say that there must be a reason.

To keep it short although maybe not simple:

308: Solid out to 1000+ meters, many quality match grade bullets to choose from, easy to load for, easy to find loading components, great barrel life (6000+)

260: Solid out to 1200+ meters, several quality match grade bullets to choose from (but who really needs more than a few), easy to load for, a tad more challenging to find loading components and a bit more expensive, reduced barrel life (2,000-3,000), fights the wind 50% better than a 308

A quality build rifle in either caliber will sever the average shooter well for years. The 260 shooter while dealing with things such as the costs and availability of ammunition and barrel life will get more hits and in more challenging conditions. If I had it to do over again I would have not sold my 308...but I still would have built my 6.5CM and would still be shooting both. If you need to choose only one then............OK choose
 
Here is my logic for a starter.
Barrel life. I expect whenever starting out you will be shooting a lot. learning load development methods, reading wind, etc... Likely the last thing you want to do is replace a barrel as soon as you have the load figured out and dialed in jus to start over.

Im building up a 308 for precisely that reason... also that the 308 is MORE sensitive to wind. Why I want more sensitive you ask? I want more sensitive because I dont want the round to overly mask bad wind readings when that is one of the things I want to work on with this build.

308: Solid out to 1000+ meters, great barrel life (6000+)

260: Solid out to 1200+ meters, reduced barrel life (2,000-3,000),
 

Quickdraw

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Here is my logic for a starter.
Barrel life. I expect whenever starting out you will be shooting a lot. learning load development methods, reading wind, etc... Likely the last thing you want to do is replace a barrel as soon as you have the load figured out and dialed in jus to start over.

Im building up a 308 for precisely that reason... also that the 308 is MORE sensitive to wind. Why I want more sensitive you ask? I want more sensitive because I dont want the round to overly mask bad wind readings when that is one of the things I want to work on with this build.
Solid reasoning on barrel life. Even a 260 won't mask the wind though and the same reasoning could be applied in the other direction to say to start with a 223 rifle. I have one as a trainer and it feels every little puff of wind. It is also cheaper to load for and has great barrel life. When the wind is below 10mph or even calm it is a tack driver out to 600m so it serves it's purpose but is still limited by it's ballistics just to a different degree than a 308 and even more so a 260.

LoL, thanks....I guess...LoL
It is hard to make a decision about the way to go.

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Point was you won't go wrong either way. Look at barrel life and availability of ammo and components versus accuracy. Choose which one you can live with. Either way a good optic will be much more critical than the choice between these 2 calibers.
 
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Quickdraw

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If I was starting over it would be one of these with one of these sitting on top. Just screw a muzzle brake and bipod on and start handloading for the next 5 years.
 
If I was starting over it would be one of these with one of these sitting on top. Just screw a muzzle brake and bipod on and start handloading for the next 5 years.
Thats a pretty solid choice. Some people just hate the accu-trigger, but I don't mind it at all. My Savage seems extra finicky with regards to bullet jump/seating depth (110BA 338LM), so I am going with a 700 on my new build. If you are weird like me you might go with a MOA scope instead of a MIL scope as well.

Starting with 223 I think is good. I started with a decent AR I already had, tossed a scope on it and started shooting. I just see a 223 being too frustrating going out to 1000 on a regular basis, and if you want to run in certain precision matches or take certain courses the 223 wont cut it.
 

Quickdraw

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Thats a pretty solid choice. Some people just hate the accu-trigger, but I don't mind it at all. My Savage seems extra finicky with regards to bullet jump/seating depth (110BA 338LM), so I am going with a 700 on my new build. If you are weird like me you might go with a MOA scope instead of a MIL scope as well.

Starting with 223 I think is good. I started with a decent AR I already had, tossed a scope on it and started shooting. I just see a 223 being too frustrating going out to 1000 on a regular basis, and if you want to run in certain precision matches or take certain courses the 223 wont cut it.
I have a Savage 10PC in 223 and previously owned a Savage 10BAS-K in 308. The Accutrigger has been great in both. The trigger that came in my Rem LTR failed after 50 rounds and was replaced with a Jewel. I have since sold both of those 308 rifles. Trigger wise the Accutrigger has functioned every bit as good as the Jewel.

The 223 in any rifle never was designed to go 1000 just like the 308 wasn't designed to go 1 mile. I use my 223 as I said as a trainer out to 600m. It can go 1000 just like a 308 can go 1 mile but not with any degree of consistency which is the purpose, right? I didn't start with a 223, it was the most recent precision rifle I picked up, for a purpose. It is the most fun bolt gun I own though.

I only own MOA scopes as well but if I was starting over that new reticle on the PST EBR-2C, similar to a Horus, sure looks nice.
 
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Quickdraw;484397 I only own MOA scopes as well but if I was starting over that new reticle on the PST EBR-2C said:
I have the PST EBR-2C MOA reticle on order. Latest estimate is third week of June ship date.

Your welcome to check it out once I get it and mounted.
 

loic1

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I do shoot my 22-250 (rem 700 sps varmint) and im trying to be consistent at 500 yards but im not. Im reloading some rounds today and will try again tomorrow early am. Im not sure my scope is holding zero though, a couple times hunting yotes, I missed him while he was not moving by at about 2. Feet high and a foot to the right and he was at about 100 yards only..

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Quickdraw

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Shooting long distances consistently and predictably requires specialized equipment. The most important piece of that equipment is a specific style of optic. One that is adjustable and readable to know predictably where you want to aim and where you are actually aiming. This requires 2 primary features:
  1. An adjustable and calibrated set of turrets to accurately change your point of aim.
  2. A calibrated and measurable reticle to get feedback from your actual shots point of impact to make adjustments to those shots.
This is why the optic is actually more important than the rifle and ammunition. Without accurate information of how your bullet is traveling and where it is landing you are doing little more that taking a WAG at where to aim other than the actual distance at where you zeroed the rifle.

Developing a long range weapons system is a straight forward and relatively simple process. It does take some time and effort to go through the learning curve though. While the internet is a great source of information it is also a distracting and equally great source for either disinformation or too much information that just leads to confusion and frustration.
 

loic1

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Make sens. For optics it also seems complicated to make the right purchase.... what would you consider a good glass that I could use now on my 22-250 that I would be able to use later for 1000 yards correctly.

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Quickdraw

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I do shoot my 22-250 (rem 700 sps varmint) and im trying to be consistent at 500 yards but im not. Im reloading some rounds today and will try again tomorrow early am. Im not sure my scope is holding zero though, a couple times hunting yotes, I missed him while he was not moving by at about 2. Feet high and a foot to the right and he was at about 100 yards only..

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Maybe this would interest you.

https://www.nevadashooters.com/showthread.php?t=53048
 

LongRange

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You can build a 260 for about $3500 bucks and thats including a high end scope new action,high end barrel and a sweet stock and when its all said and done youll be happier with a 6.5 that youd be with a 308...theres tons of brass for the 260 as well as bullets just take you pick and add H4350 H4831SC or reloader 17 and you have a tac driver if you can do your part.
 

Quickdraw

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Make sens. For optics it also seems complicated to make the right purchase.... what would you consider a good glass that I could use now on my 22-250 that I would be able to use later for 1000 yards correctly.

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That is one of the questions for the ages. It has been discussed here and really everywhere many times. It seems like the first and most important question will always come down to: How much are you able to spend?

This thread in addition to these other ones have a bunch of information on that subject. There have been many other options come onto the market over the past few years.

https://www.nevadashooters.com/showthread.php?t=16669

https://www.nevadashooters.com/showthread.php?t=32245

for a quick answer - price vs features: http://www.vortexoptics.com/product/vortex-viper-pst-6-24x50-ffp-riflescope-with-ebr-2c-mrad-reticle/reticle
 

loic1

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I'm almond at the ldr, I'm going to try some be load for my 22-250, I hope they and me will do well....LOL

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Snipersis27

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Scopes

I have decided to start to get into long range precision shooting. I know that this will be a journey and will take time and practice. Right now I'm shooting a Ruger M77 .270 and know that this a 200-300 yard gun because it was built to hunt. It is probably a 2 or 3moa gun. The barrel, stock and trigger will never get me where I want to go but will give me good 200 yrd practice to start developing my habits and skills.

So I've been doing alot of research and have narrowed things down a little. I have a few choices but they are definitely going in different directions. Choice #1: bolt action Savage model 10 FCP-K http://www.savagearms.com/firearms/models/ (need to click center fire, Law Enforcement, 10 FCP=K). It will run $800ish and still need bipod $100ish, scope mounts$150ish. I have a decent scope. Total $1050.
Choice #2 Semi Auto DPMS LR 308 or 30LRT-SASS http://www.dpmsinc.com/store/products/?prod=4851 or http://www.dpmsinc.com/store/products/?prod=1999
LR 308 $1300ish with chrome bolt and action. Same bipod and scope mounts. Total $1500 or SASS $2100 complete.

All three of these choices should be sub MOA although the bolt gun should stay that way to maybe 1200yrds, SA guns maybe 1000yrds although the .308 may only be able to do the job out to 800-1000yrds. SA guns are more versatile to also use in CQB role. Also the SASS is 7.62 vs .308.

So what are the pros and cons as you see them on these 3 weapons? I really don't want to talk about every other weapon in the world so let's stick to these. I'm staying with this caliber for my new weapon for the practical reason of availability of good match ammo and reloading mixes. Also is my budget for scope mounts doable? I'm thinking a Pic rail and rings. What is a good setup to use?
I've been with plenty of hunters spending so much $$$ on different scopes, especially when it comes to night yote hunts! I just cheat is the plain fact! I use a "night optic" thermal biocular 75mm objective! 336x288. Eliminates glossing with green or red lights! Once you have tried it, you will never go back!!!! Take it from an ex-sniper! Lol :gottatakeadump: