"Tactical" Precision tricks, techniques, discussion

Vegas50

1 Mile Shot Club
#41
The seated stage was my weakest one. My rifle is too heave for my weak left arm to steady for long. I was resting the rifle on my knee and leaning back to get proper eye relief. Managed to salvage a few hits that way.

I will be shooting that savage 223 quite a bit in the up coming weeks. Mainly seated or off a barricade like object. That rifle is heavy, much like the 6.5 and should be good cheap practice.
 

ScottyS

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#42
You rocked that stage right out of the gates! Wait until you get to shoot the moving target! Its a lot of fun!!

I've been using chairs to replicate the unstable barracade and have been trying to figure out things that work for me. Sonic Sammy gave me a sling to use and I think that will help my seated shooting a lot.
Barricade stages differ depending on how steady the barricades are, for sure. I have shot some very solid barricades (as one would encounter in the real world) and a lot of very flexible ones (annoying).

I typically set up my position on the flexible ones (that will not support leaning into, etc) with a push-pull tension of sorts. The support hand pulls back the barricade while also tracking the forend of the rifle. I have been known to tilt the rifle a couple degrees to press the front of the objective against the vertical side of the barricade in the kneeling and sitting positions, so that the rifle indexes the same every time. Typical barricade targets are large enough to allow this sort of adaptation.
 

JFComfort

Long Range Shooter
#43
Barricade stages differ depending on how steady the barricades are, for sure. I have shot some very solid barricades (as one would encounter in the real world) and a lot of very flexible ones (annoying).

I typically set up my position on the flexible ones (that will not support leaning into, etc) with a push-pull tension of sorts. The support hand pulls back the barricade while also tracking the forend of the rifle. I have been known to tilt the rifle a couple degrees to press the front of the objective against the vertical side of the barricade in the kneeling and sitting positions, so that the rifle indexes the same every time. Typical barricade targets are large enough to allow this sort of adaptation.

Damn!! Thank you Scotty, I didnt even think to use the vertal portion of the barricade. You can put the rifle in that corner to get some added stability (wont work on the highest level). I will have to remember that for next time.

Since I'm tall that 49" barricade is hard to get a good shooting position behind and as the stages progresses you move lower and lower on the barricade. I've been practicing using my off hand on the barricade under the stock of the rifle, then getting it solid into my shoulder and letting the rifle "float" it seems to be working but I have to test it.

Sort of like this but I dont lean on the barricade as bad, I try and squat and gain support from my lower body.



Scotty I felt like the more I tried to brace agenst the barricade the worse it got!
 
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ScottyS

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#44
Damn!! Thank you Scotty, I didnt even think to use the vertal portion of the barricade. You can put the rifle in that corner to get some added stability (wont work on the highest level). I will have to remember that for next time.

Since I'm tall that 49" barricade is hard to get a good shooting position behind and as the stages progresses you move lower and lower on the barricade. I've been practicing using my off hand on the barricade under the stock of the rifle, then getting it solid into my shoulder and letting the rifle "float" it seems to be working but I have to test it.
Yeah. The interface between the stock and the barricade material is important as well. For instance, with my M40A1 I do not use a bipod, for old times' sake, like I do with my AR's and other rifles. A pad of sorts under the forearm can help. I'll take some photos at some point when I get a chance.

The standing barricade position is the hardest for me if it is flopping around, and I'm only 6'2".
 

JFComfort

Long Range Shooter
#45
Yeah. The interface between the stock and the barricade material is important as well. For instance, with my M40A1 I do not use a bipod, for old times' sake, like I do with my AR's and other rifles. A pad of sorts under the forearm can help. I'll take some photos at some point when I get a chance.

The standing barricade position is the hardest for me if it is flopping around, and I'm only 6'2".
I'm 6'1" and that thing is a pain! Hugh, the guy in the picture looks like he's going to tip it over! I'm going to start taking off the bi-pod before this stage and I'm going to see if I can use my rear rest on the barricade itself.
 
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#48
i really like the butler creek suspension ones for holding standing shots. Works really well in deer hunting and helps to keep you stable. HAve a couple mounts to prove that it works :getsome:. Hey JF i would love to come to this events and even praticipate. Ill be trying to get my rig to be able to shoot 500. If you are willing maybe you can help me get my rings and such pick out as i have no idea what base etc.. Maybe a beer night or something. Also down to do some JF tactical matches and can help cut and weld some stand and targets to get the process rolling.
 

JFComfort

Long Range Shooter
#49
i really like the butler creek suspension ones for holding standing shots. Works really well in deer hunting and helps to keep you stable. HAve a couple mounts to prove that it works :getsome:. Hey JF i would love to come to this events and even praticipate. Ill be trying to get my rig to be able to shoot 500. If you are willing maybe you can help me get my rings and such pick out as i have no idea what base etc.. Maybe a beer night or something. Also down to do some JF tactical matches and can help cut and weld some stand and targets to get the process rolling.

You have my number so hit me up and Ill give you a hand with whatever I can. The matches are the first saturday of every month except July, august. Match starts at 8 am at Desert Sportsman. Bring $20, 60 rounds and a shooting mat.

JF Tactical matches are whenever we all get out together with the steel targets. I would like to do courses of fire like the ones 6mm fan came up with. It would be great for practicing dope'en shots and range estimation practice.
 

Vegas50

1 Mile Shot Club
#50
I took the savage practice gun and 80 rounds of wolf out to the range yesterday for some seated and barricade practice shooting. Used the bench as a mid level and the stool as the low level. Also worked on a few different seated ideas. The pig was getting drilled early on, but trying to get a shot and reload in under 6 seconds really dropped the hit rate down... granted the pig is the size of a bus compared to the targets at the match. I can feel some muscles in my legs that arnt too happy with me today from all that squatting while shooting.


The wind was 15-20mph with gusts to 30, enough to flex the steel flag pole.
 
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JFComfort

Long Range Shooter
#51
I took the savage practice gun and 80 rounds of wolf out to the range yesterday for some seated and barricade practice shooting. Used the bench as a mid level and the stool as the low level. Also worked on a few different seated ideas. The pig was getting drilled early on, but trying to get a shot and reload in under 6 seconds really dropped the hit rate down... granted the pig is the size of a bus compared to the targets at the match. I can feel some muscles in my legs that arnt too happy with me today from all that squatting while shooting.


The wind was 15-20mph with gusts to 30, enough to flex the steel flag pole.
My hip flexers are beat from sitting Indian style in the living room all evening!
 

ScottyS

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#52
What slings are reccomended for this type of shooting? I have an old cotton GI sling for my Garand, but can't seem to find it. I am sure it would help but are there better options.

How to use the web sling
Whatever you use, you typically need to get in and out of it fast if you want to use it in competition. The old-school Turner 1907 sling that I have is set up for a couple positions, but in order to use it properly you have to take a little time to get into place. I have the TIS sling with the clip-on armband on a couple rifles, and it works OK.

The thing about slings is that you have to spend a lot of time practicing with them, and getting comfortable with getting into them fast and knowing how they work in different positions. I have to admit that I am not a sling specialist, and rarely use one in competitions. They can give a tremendous advantage when used properly and in combination with correct body positioning, but I am too used to "shooting on the fly" and not messing with slings. I tend to utilize them as a shooting aid only when I will be sending a long string from one position.
 

ziebart

Guest
#53
That is what I was looking for. I know that the old school web slings and the 1907 sling can be used for very stable platforms but getting them into position can be time consuming. I had hoped that modern slings may have improved speed of employment.

When you say that the TIS sling is OK, are there better options out there? Or is it something that you need to just balance each ones problems and learn to mitigate them?
 

Swan

Guest
#54
That is what I was looking for. I know that the old school web slings and the 1907 sling can be used for very stable platforms but getting them into position can be time consuming. I had hoped that modern slings may have improved speed of employment.

When you say that the TIS sling is OK, are there better options out there? Or is it something that you need to just balance each ones problems and learn to mitigate them?
I've been using the TIS quick cuff sling in the matches and have had great results with it. It takes a bit to get it fitted exactly but I doubt I'll use anything else for a while. As ScottyS said though, practice is crucial with these slings. I've made a routine of saving 5-10rds at the end of a session to shoot seated with a sling. Not enough, but better than no practice at all.
 
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ScottyS

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#55
That is what I was looking for. I know that the old school web slings and the 1907 sling can be used for very stable platforms but getting them into position can be time consuming. I had hoped that modern slings may have improved speed of employment.

When you say that the TIS sling is OK, are there better options out there? Or is it something that you need to just balance each ones problems and learn to mitigate them?
There are several different ways to use a sling fast - the TIS is one of the better ones. A simple wrap setup also can help in speedy scenarios, but does not really allow for super-tight holds when you have time to get adjusted. The TIS sling can be used in different ways, making it more flexible, as Swan has pointed out.
 

JFComfort

Long Range Shooter
#56
I want to keep this thread going. I'm going to brain storm more tips and tricks I use in comps and long range shooting.

If any of you guys have something to contribute please do!
 

ScottyS

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#57
I want to keep this thread going. I'm going to brain storm more tips and tricks I use in comps and long range shooting.

If any of you guys have something to contribute please do!
It will keep going......I'm just not focusing on this right now. It's more of a long term project. At least you got it stickied, that will remind me!
 

ScottyS

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#58
Here you go:

Do you typically

a) dial both windage and elevation
b) hold one or the other
c) hold both

?

It's somewhat of a trick question, but it will bring out a good discussion.
 

JFComfort

Long Range Shooter
#59
Here you go:

Do you typically

a) dial both windage and elevation
b) hold one or the other
c) hold both

?

It's somewhat of a trick question, but it will bring out a good discussion.
I dial both elevation and windage at the start of a stage. I use hold overs to make corrections mid stage or during sudden changes in conditions.

I've been thinking of working on using my retical (NP-R2) to hold over because I feel I can accurately make the hits at the ranges we shoot and save time.
 

ScottyS

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#60
Shooting holdovers-only is actually pretty fun. I think that at short ranges on steel it is a good idea. It gets you used to the actual values/distances, and allows for speedy transitions across ranges.

For fixed long-range work, I typically dial the elevation and hold the windage.