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Tbirds

7.62

Obsessed Member
Forum Supporter
#6
Ahhhh man, sad news. I live near the base (NAFB) the grandson and I boogie up the ladder and watch them from the roof whenever they practice. One comes right over the house cookin.

Prayers for the pilot and the rest of the guys and family
 

Harley

Obsessed Member
Forum Supporter
#10
Does anybody know specifically where it went down? They make it sound like it far out in the test range in which case why not eject and let it crash and burn? Ejection failure? Or was it close enough to where he stayed with it trying to avoid homes/people?
 

Gullwing

1911 pistolsmith
Staff member
Moderator
#11
It was close to Creech, seen by people there and maybe on the 95. Don't know what happened, if he ejected, if there was an issue with ejecting or if not time. Not much was left of the pilot so...
Safety office is going to be busy, so many failures of Creech fire department. Radios spent so long on the chargers that they fried the batteries so no radios when they rolled out. Fire chief was removed about a year ago, no one stepped up to know what their radio call signs were, but then with no radios....

Most of the coverage of the crash I have seen on the news talks about budget cuts causing three crashes this week. But Thunderbirds aren't affected by that, they get from the top of the pot.
 

Harley

Obsessed Member
Forum Supporter
#12
It was close to Creech, seen by people there and maybe on the 95. Don't know what happened, if he ejected, if there was an issue with ejecting or if not time. Not much was left of the pilot so...
Safety office is going to be busy, so many failures of Creech fire department. Radios spent so long on the chargers that they fried the batteries so no radios when they rolled out. Fire chief was removed about a year ago, no one stepped up to know what their radio call signs were, but then with no radios....

Most of the coverage of the crash I have seen on the news talks about budget cuts causing three crashes this week. But Thunderbirds aren't affected by that, they get from the top of the pot.
Since it was that close I’m guessing he stayed with it trying to avoid others and ran out of time.

Thats too bad about all the failures. The Thunderbirds haven’t had much luck in recent years. I saw the one in Colorado Springs go down when I lived there.
 

7.62

Obsessed Member
Forum Supporter
#13
We see them regularly here and I've seen them while on base at Creech. Just a month ago I had the pleasure of shaking hands with a few of the ground crew at NAFB while doing some work at the their hanger.

I'm really saddened, I've read on another site about some conspiracy type BS, how could this, how could that.

When you see them a few times a week, for years.......my personal belief is these guys push the limit, day in and day out. I've often thought to myself....sheesh if this guy Fuchs up he's gonna hit the house.

I have nothing but the highest respect for the Pilots and all involved.

As a family we are deeply saddened and our hearts ♥️ morn the loss like it was.
 

LASCHRIS

"Life is hard enough. It's harder when your stupid
#14
seat of the pants stick and rudder flying requires constant small corrections. All it takes is one over/under correction during very precise maneuvering to cause a situation where there is no escape.

This is very sad. Loss of a great pilot and family man.
 

Harley

Obsessed Member
Forum Supporter
#15
Just read an interview where they say one clipped another at low altitude.

"The airplanes have got to be in great shape, which they are, because they've got marvelous maintenance," said retired Lt. Gen. Tom McInerney. "It sounds like one of the airplanes clipped the other one. I don't know that for sure... It's very difficult for the pilot to get out of the airplane at such a low altitude so fast."
 

Gullwing

1911 pistolsmith
Staff member
Moderator
#16
Just read an interview where they say one clipped another at low altitude.

"The airplanes have got to be in great shape, which they are, because they've got marvelous maintenance," said retired Lt. Gen. Tom McInerney. "It sounds like one of the airplanes clipped the other one. I don't know that for sure... It's very difficult for the pilot to get out of the airplane at such a low altitude so fast."
That makes sense. For a while (several minutes/few seconds whatever it was) they couldn't get a hold of another plane. Probably busy assessing his situation.
 

Makulit

Very Active Member
#17
seat of the pants stick and rudder flying requires constant small corrections. All it takes is one over/under correction during very precise maneuvering to cause a situation where there is no escape.

This is very sad. Loss of a great pilot and family man.
What he said; :sad:
 
#18
Since it was that close I’m guessing he stayed with it trying to avoid others and ran out of time.
No pilot in an ejection seat aircraft has this in their decisionmaking matrix.

If the airplane were controllable enough following a midair collision to be able to make it avoid hitting civilians, then there wouldn't be a need to eject.
 

Gullwing

1911 pistolsmith
Staff member
Moderator
#19
No pilot in an ejection seat aircraft has this in their decisionmaking matrix.

If the airplane were controllable enough following a midair collision to be able to make it avoid hitting civilians, then there wouldn't be a need to eject.
Not sure the situation but several years ago a Thunderbird? was preforming in an airshow and the plane was going down. Pilot ejected and plane crashed away from the crowd.
During the investigation the investigators asked the pilot why it was on the third time reaching for the ejection handle he actually pulled it.
He replied that he pulled it on the first attempt.
They showed him the cockpit video where he was flying looked down at the picture of his son reached for the handle looked outside went back to the stick before looking down at his son and reaching for the handle...
 
#20
They showed him the cockpit video where he was flying looked down at the picture of his son reached for the handle looked outside went back to the stick before looking down at his son and reaching for the handle...
No pilot *wants* to eject, for a multitude of psychological reasons.

The #1 reason for unsuccessful ejections (e.g. the pilot died) is a delayed decision to eject.

It usually has to do with both an inherent desire to fix the situation (ejecting is admitting defeat), as well as a feeling that whatever went wrong might be the result of something that pilot did wrong (and, again, ejecting is admitting making a mistake that can't be fixed).

One of the "delayed decision" factors is being concerned about people on the ground...and we are trained repeatedly to discount that, and all of the other "delayed decision" factors.

Pilots of ejection seat aircraft are trained to "make the decision to eject on the ground". In other words, analyze and know what the set of factors are in which the correct path is to pull the ejection handles before you ever strap on the airplane...and don't deviate from that decision if you ever encounter those specific factors.

I used to work for Chris Stricklin, and I've heard him speak on his ejection more than once. Stricklin did vacillate on his decision to eject (as many pilots, despite the training, do), and you can indeed see his hand move on and off the ejection seat loop more than once during the video. I never heard him say anything regarding "looking down at his son" before making the decision to eject.

In this article, he is quoted about what went through his mind:

http://www.gregoryafreeman.com/_pdf/Eject.pdf