The Basic How To's of Wing Shooting (Shotgunnery 101)

NYECOGunsmith

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#1
You asked for it, here it is.

With successful wing shooting as the goal, there are a number of things which must all be taken into account to achieve that goal.

First, the shotgun has to fit the shooter.
The length of pull, drop at the comb, heel , and toe , the cast (on or off) and the pitch must all be correct.

This is because the shooter’s eye is the rear sight on the shotgun, and if any of the above items are incorrect, then it becomes very difficult to get the same shoulder weld and cheek weld with each mounting of the shotgun.

Failing to get the gun into the same place in the shoulder pocket and against the cheek each time we mount it means that the rear sight is not going to be in the same place, and at that point we have two options.

They are: Miss the bird, or squirm around trying to get the “rear sight” into the right place, and maybe hitting the bird , or maybe losing it because we take to long to get there.

Once the fit of the gun is correct, then you have to work on mounting it properly.

And it helps to know in advance where you want the point of aim and point of impact to coincide.

If the shotgun has a mid point bead, this becomes easy to predict. The mid point bead, by the way, is the smaller bead in the middle of the barrel’s length.

With the gun mounted, look along the barrel and see how the two beads line up.

If the mid point bead is sitting below the front bead, so that they form a “Figure 8” and the top of the “8” is larger than the bottom, then the gun is going to shoot high for you.

If the figure 8 is larger at the bottom (because the front bead is below the mid bead) the gun is going to shoot low for you.

If the two beads line up height wise, the gun will shoot point of aim equal to point of impact at reasonable distances.

If the mid bead is to the right or left of the front bead, the gun is going to shoot to the right or left of the point of aim, following where the mid point bead is with relation to the front bead, but in reverse. If the mid point bead is to the left of the front bead, the gun will shoot to the right of your point of aim, and if it is too the right of the front bead, it will shoot towards the left of your point of aim.

And of course you can always have a combination of the above, mid bead below the front bead and to the right of it for example, will give you a gun that shoots high and to the left.

For an all around use shotgun, I prefer (and used to promote to my customers) setting the gun up so that it shoots a bit high at a given distance.

This way, whatever the target is, it is always visible to the shooter. If Point of aim and point of impact coincide, or the gun shoots low, the target is obscured by the muzzle and there is no advantage to that which I have ever been able to find.

Once we have the gun fitting the shooter, we can start on the mount, getting the gun to the same place every time it goes to your shoulder.

You need to form the “pocket” where the butt will rest against your shoulder the same each time, and get the butt into the pocket in the same place, then bring the gun up to your cheek so that it meets your cheek at the same spot, time after time.

One way I have found to do this is to pick a spot about 6 feet out in from of your feet, and with the gun held slightly away from the body, and with it’s left side towards the ground (if right handed, if left handed, the right side towards the ground, so that the sides of the stock are parallel to the ground) rotate the gun to the normal vertical orientation (butt stock is now perpendicular to the ground).

Rotating the stock 90° like this may seem odd, but it forms a muscle memory that helps to ensure the gun comes up to your cheek with the comb straight up and down, and not canted out to the right (or to the left, if left handed).

Now lift the butt of the gun up to the shoulder pocket, while keeping the muzzle pointed towards the ground at that point about 6 feet in front of you. This will have the gun forming approximately a 45° angle between your shoulder and that spot 6 feet out in front of you.

The toe of the stock should touch the shoulder pocket first if you follow the above steps. When it does, stop, raise your head up until your eyes are parallel to the ground (your head is level, you are looking straight out , level with the ground) and now without moving your head, keep the toe of the stock against your shoulder and raise the muzzle until the comb contacts your cheek.

Do NOT duck or scrunch your face/head down to meet the stock.

We can’t tighten our muscles the same way twice in a row, and the stock must contact our face at the same place each time. Bringing the gun to the face is the only way to achieve that, trying to bring your face down onto the stock by tightening the neck muscles, bending the head over the stock, etc. will NOT result in the cheek ending up on the stock in the same spot time after time.
Additionally, bringing your face to the stock instead of the other way around will generally result in it ending up in a position where your cheek will get a nice slap when the gun goes off.

At this point the gun should be level , parallel to the ground, pulled back firmly into the shoulder pocket, and held at the wrist of the stock and at the forearm, so that the gun’s balance point is just slightly behind the hand holding the forearm.

The hand on the forearm (left hand for right handed folks, right hand for lefties) should have the index finger parallel to the barrel and either laying alongside the left side of the forearm or on the bottom side of it.

The remaining four fingers of that hand are curled around the forearm to grasp it and control the swing.

The firing hand should have the index finger pointing towards the muzzle as well, with the other four fingers curled around the wrist of the gunstock, and the thumb on the top of the wrist , tip of the thumb pointing towards the muzzle and parallel to the barrel (s), not wrapped across the wrist. Wrapping the thumb of the firing hand around the wrist is not necessary for a secure grasp of the stock, but it will pretty much guarantee that at some point in time, you will smack yourself in the nose with that thumb when the gun goes off!

Why point those index fingers? Because where the fingers point , the eyes look, the bird flies and gets hit. And your goal here is to WATCH THE BIRD, not the front bead. With fingers pointed like this, that becomes second nature. You can lose the front bead altogether and not have your scores or kills suffer once it becomes habit to watch the bird and track it with the muzzle and your fingers.

Once you have mastered mounting the gun properly, you need to have a solid base to shoot it from.

This means proper foot placement, and proper body alignment. And this only applies to clay pigeon shooting, it’s pretty much impossible to always place your feet and align your body for every shot when hunting game birds, but this practice on the clays field will help with that.

The skeet field is one of the easiest places to learn to place the feet properly and align the body correctly for each shot, and once that is done, it will translate to the trap field and the sporting clays course easily.

This is because, on the skeet field, we know the flight path of the birds from both houses, and we know that a bird from either house must pass over that central registration point during its flight.

We’ll start with station three high house as an example. This station requires about 3 feet of lead. For a right handed individual, you place your left foot in front of your right foot, with the distance between your feet being about equal to the width of your shoulders. Place yourself so that the toes of your left foot point to a place about 3 feet to the right (towards the LOW house in other words) of that central crossing point. If you now mount the gun as described above, when you get the barrel(s) parallel to the ground and are looking out over the muzzle, you will find that you are pointing the gun at a point about two thirds of the distance from the high house towards the low house. This is where you want to break the bird, and it is where your body will be comfortably at rest and ready to trigger the shot to accomplish that act.

As I mentioned earlier, we can’t wind up or tension our muscles the same time after time, we’re not that mechanical a machine. And winding them up or tensioning them generally results in a series of small, jerky movements.

However, we can unwind our muscles smoothly time after time.

So we position ourselves so that when we are completely at rest and unwound, we are pointing at the place where we want to trigger the shot to break the bird, and then we “wind up” BACK towards where the bird will come from. In this case, the high house.

We want to keep our feet planted and just turn the torso from the waist up, until we are looking at a point about 6-10 feet out from the opening in the high house where the bird will appear, looking at that point with the center of our field of vision. This puts our peripheral vision just about at the opening of the high house.

Since our peripheral vision is best at detecting moving objects, and our central vision is best at determining the object’s speed and location, this is a good place to be looking.

When the bird emerges, our peripheral vision will detect it very quickly, and at the point in its flight where the bird stabilizes (about 6-10 feet from the trap) and begins to slow down, we will see it clearly and begin to make the judgments of its speed, distance, and flight path.

By the way, learn to shoot with both eyes open, not only with a shotgun, but with a rifle and pistol as well, iron sights and optics, it makes a big difference with all of them.

With both eyes open, the moving target will appear to be larger and moving slower than it will if you have one eye closed.

Why limit your vision, there is no need. The brain just has to be retrained to focus its attention on the dominant eye if you have been shooting with one eye closed, and that is easily accomplished. And you are safer with both eyes open in pretty much any situation than you are with one of them closed.

OK, at this point, if the gun is already mounted , you use which ever of the techniques your prefer to establish the proper lead. Remember to keep the barrel moving, even after you trigger the shot, no matter what type of lead you use. Stopping the barrel pretty much guarantees you will end up shooting behind the bird.

Those types of leads are:

The Swing Through Lead, some folks call it the “Fast Swing Lead”, where you start behind the bird, moving the gun forward at a rate of speed faster than the bird is traveling, so that you follow the path the bird has already taken, over take it, pass through the bird , establish the correct amount of lead and trigger the shot, and keep the barrel moving, maintaining that lead even after the shot is fired and the bird has broken.

I usually mention the above form of lead first, as it is the most useful in the opinion of most professional and highly ranked amateur competitors in Trap, Skeet, 5 Stand and Sporting Clays.
This is because it is the most effective way to handle pretty much any airborne target you come across, including live game birds.

It gives you a nearly automatic response in terms of compensating for targets that move at varying speeds.
Clay pigeons start out fast, and slow down due to air resistance, wind, etc., and this method allows you to compensate for that without having to do a lot of thinking.
Basically, the faster the target is moving, the faster you move the shotgun, if the target slows down, you slow your swing. This lead is great because it works on calm days, and on windy days when the birds do some strange things, and you have the ability to instantly adapt to the changing flight characteristics of the bird.

About the only disadvantage to this technique I have ever found, is that no two shooters who use it can agree on how much lead they gave a particular bird. It appears different to each of them based on their speed of swing. But once YOU learn to use it and get a mind set of how much lead any particular bird requires, you can break a lot of birds this way.

The Maintained Lead, also sometimes called the “Sustained Lead” is where you establish the lead out in front of the bird right from the start, keep the barrel moving with the bird at that distance in front of it while you trigger the shot , and keep the barrel moving even after you trigger the shot.

The Maintained Lead works well on Skeet and Trap, however, if the weather changes and the birds start to dance, same thing for trap, you can be in trouble. It doesn't work so well on Sporting Clays, since the birds fly at different speeds and angles from every trap on the course.

It does offer the advantage, however, that the amount of lead one shooter sees for a particular shot at Trap or Skeet, will be pretty much the same amount of lead that any other shooter who uses the Maintained Lead will see, so you can communicate how much lead to use to a beginning shooter, or to one who is having trouble hitting a particular station’s birds.

The Pull Away Lead, for this one you find the bird, sight ON the bird, then increase the speed of your swing so that you pull the muzzle out in front of the bird to the correct distance, trigger the shot, and keep the barrel moving.
This technique can cause problems if you are slow to acquire the bird, or have not yet developed a smooth swing.

The Snapshot, sometimes called the “Ambush” lead or the “Fence Post” technique. You don’t follow the path of the bird, you pick a spot where your mind tells you the bird will be, point the muzzle at it, and trigger the shot when the bird is the correct distance away from that point and still moving towards it. This one takes a lot of practice and is not as consistent in the break rate it delivers as the other three methods.

No matter what technique you decide to use, you must keep that barrel moving even after you trigger the shot. You want to “Paint the bird out of the sky” as we say. This is because the shot column or shot string as some call it, is coming out of the barrel like water from a hose.
Not all the shot is going to get to the point of intersection (where the shot and the bird come together, remember, this is deflection shooting, we are putting the shot where the target will be, so that they run into each other) at the same time. The pellets at the head of the column get there first, and the ones at the base of the base of the column (they were the ones against the over powder wad, or the shot cup’s bottom ) will get there last.

The bird is still moving at the point in time when you fire, if you stop the barrel while the bird keeps on moving, the majority of the time you will end up shooting behind the bird.

If you started with the gun down, as the bird appears in your field of view, mount the gun , establish the lead, trigger the shot, break the bird, and follow through.

One trick for developing a smooth, steady swing is (if you are shooting a 12 gauge that is) , is to acquire a double AA mini Mag light , wrap a bit of electrical tape around the grip portion of the flashlight, turn it on, focus it to the tightest spotlight beam you can.

With the gun EMPTY (No ammo on the room, triple check it!) slip the Mini Mag down the barrel.

A laser bore sighter, if you have one that fits a 12 gauge (or 20, 28, .410, they can be had for all those) will work fine also.

Stand in the middle of the room, facing a corner so that the seam between the two walls is directly in front of you.

With the muzzle down, mount the gun slowly so that the beam from the flashlight starts at the floor and follows the corner where the two walls meet as the gun comes level with your face.

Once it is there, keep lifting the muzzle until the light beam reaches the corner where the two walls and the ceiling all meet.

Then traverse (swing) the muzzle to the right, following the corner where the ceiling and the wall meet and lower the gun. Mount it again in the same manner, this time, swing to the left, following the seam of that wall and the ceiling to the next vertical corner. Lower the gun, and repeat.

You are not trying for speed here, what you are trying for is a smooth mount and a steady , smooth swing. The speed will come with repetition.

The above practice, if done for 15 minutes a day, will help a lot with shooting clays and live game birds.

How Much Lead Do I Use?

I hear that question a lot.
There is no magic formula or perfect answer to that question.

How much lead you need depends on the distance to the bird, the speed it is traveling at, the angle (s) to the bird (both elevation and traversing) and the speed of the shot column.

Most target and field loads with 1 and 1/8th ounces of shot (# 7.5, 8, 8.5 and 9 are the only sizes allowed on skeet, trap and sporting clays fields) will exit the muzzle at somewhere between 1200 and 1250 Feet Per Second, so that is the one variable you can control in the mix of things that goes into making the “how much lead for this shot” decision.

For birds coming straight at you, or going straight away from you (trap stations 2,3,4 for example, or Skeet stations 1 and 7) very little lead is needed, a foot will generally get the job done on with an Improved Cylinder or Skeet choke on the skeet field or from the 16 yard line on the trap field.

As the angle goes from a narrow one (Think Station 1 high house on the skeet field) to a wide one (almost a perfect 90° at station 4 on the skeet field) the amount of lead increases.

With skeet, determining the lead is pretty easy. Stations 1 and 7, both high and low house birds require about 1 foot of lead.

Station 2, is about 2 feet for both high and low house birds.
Station 3, 3 feet for both.
Station 4, 4 feet for both.


Station 5 is like station 3, 3 feet of lead for both.
Station 6 is like station 2, 2 feet of lead for both.

A clay pigeon traveling at 40 MPH covers not quite 60 feet in one second, while that shot column coming out of the barrel at say, 1250 FPS, covers that same distance in 1/20th of a second. So in that 1/20th of a second, the bird is traveling roughly 3 feet.

Give a crosser at close range, say, 20 yards, a lead of 3 feet and it should fall somewhere in your pattern.

If you break the bird, and didn't see HOW it broke, ask if anyone saw whether you broke the leading edge (the nose, that is, the leading edge of the bird on the side in the direction the bird is flying) of the bird, the trailing edge (the tail) or hit is solidly in the middle.

As an example, if a bird is flying from your left towards your right, the nose of the bird would be on the right side and at the 3 o’clock position if the bird were stationary and there were a clock face painted on it. The tail would be at the 9 o’clock position.

Break the head, (12 o’clock position) and you are holding a bit too high, the feet (6 o’clock position) and you are holding a bit too low.

And of course it is possible to be too far ahead and too high, to far behind and too low, any combination of those four things.

If you are hitting the bird on the nose, shorten the lead by 6 inches to a foot, as you broke the bird with the trailing edge of your pattern (you were a bit too far in front of it).

If you broke the tail, you hit it with the leading edge of the pattern, and you need to add 6 inches to a foot to the amount of lead for that shot.

Shot the head? You hit it with the bottom of the pattern, drop the muzzle a bit.

Hit the feet? Raise the muzzle a bit, you hit it with the top of the pattern.

Solidly in the middle, your lead was just fine, and so was your elevation.

If you missed it, ask the observer if they can tell if you were behind it or ahead of it, most of the time you will be behind it, so add some lead until you break the bird, then do it a few more times to cement in your mind how much lead that shot requires. Some folks can see the shot string clearly and will be able to tell you where it was in relation to the bird.

Shooting at the rolling rabbit clays on the sporting clays course will let you know instantly when you miss where you were, just look for the cloud of rising dust and see where it is in relation to the still virgin clay rolling happily away. Then apply the appropriate correction, more or less lead, more or less elevation.

In summary, the best way to learn how much lead to use for a variety of shots is to do a lot of shooting. Shoot skeet for starters, it will teach you to swing smoothly and keep the gun moving, and it will also teach you to judge the lead at different angles and speeds, since the birds tend to slow down a bit faster on the skeet traps.

Trap will teach you how to hit rising birds, and birds that are going away from you at slightly diverging angles.

Sporting clays will continue your education on lead, swing and follow through.

But whatever you shoot, try to do so with an experienced shooter along at first, someone who can see the shot string, take notice when you don’t get your feet set right, point out when you stopped your swing, lifted your head from the stock, canted the gun, flubbed the mount, misjudged the lead and in what direction, etc.

If you get tired, (this applies to any form of shooting, shotguns, rifles , pistols) STOP SHOOTING.

Shooting when tired lowers your level of safety, and it can lead you to develop bad habits that can take a lot of practice and sometimes instruction to get rid of. It can also lead to injury if you get so tired you don’t mount the gun properly, and it slaps you in the face, etc.

As always, if you have questions, drop me a PM or post them here, and if you catch me at the Clark County Shotgun Facility, lessons are always available, and they are free, just supply your own shotgun, ammo, and pay for the birds YOU shoot.

Just don’t expect the lessons to be quick and instantly learned, learning to shoot a shotgun take time and lots of practice. I've been at it close to 60 years now, and I’m still getting the hang of it, even after literally millions of rounds fired at Skeet, Trap, 5 Stand and Sporting Clays, plus hunting live game birds. Just don’t get discouraged is all I’m saying, if you don’t become the world’s greatest wing shot overnight.
__________________
 

Dusty

Obsessed Member
Forum Supporter
#2
I'm fixing to read this. I had to scroll to the bottom first to see If I had enough time to read it. You just never know if you are going to get a book or a paragraph when it comes to NyeCo:smilielol5::lkick:

Edit. It was a good read full of awesome info as always!! :goodpost:
 

NYECOGunsmith

Obsessed Member
Staff member
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#3
I'm fixing to read this. I had to scroll to the bottom first to see If I had enough time to read it. You just never know if you are going to get a book or a paragraph when it comes to NyeCo:smilielol5::lkick:

Edit. It was a good read full of awesome info as always!! :goodpost:
And this was the abbreviated, Reader's Digest Condensed version.........the internet would have ground to a halt if I put all the info on this subject here :001_tt2::lkick:.

In actuality, even if I put everything I have ever learned about this subject down here for you all to read, it wouldn't do as much good as a couple of hours at the range and a 100 birds fired at on the skeet field, or out on the sporting clays course.

This is just to get someone started until they can spend some time shooting with someone who knows how to do it AND who can teach it to others.

One of these days with this nice weather we are having we should put together a Nevada Shooters Day at the Clark County shotgun park, group lessons session.
 

pick_six

Adjusting to the west!
#4
This post, and the portion in the other thread were well done!!! thank you!

it's interesting, but some stuff here, i've sort of learned or picked up and maybe thought about a bit. for example, i really like the mid bead on my goto gun, and miss it on my 870. and some of the lead stuff as well.

but many of the other points, i just never thought of or considered.

if you do the thing at ccsc, please drop a line. it would be interesting to learn more from a professional.


And this was the abbreviated, Reader's Digest Condensed version.........the internet would have ground to a halt if I put all the info on this subject here :001_tt2::lkick:.

In actuality, even if I put everything I have ever learned about this subject down here for you all to read, it wouldn't do as much good as a couple of hours at the range and a 100 birds fired at on the skeet field, or out on the sporting clays course.

This is just to get someone started until they can spend some time shooting with someone who knows how to do it AND who can teach it to others.

One of these days with this nice weather we are having we should put together a Nevada Shooters Day at the Clark County shotgun park, group lessons session.
 

NYECOGunsmith

Obsessed Member
Staff member
Moderator
#5
This post, and the portion in the other thread were well done!!! thank you!

it's interesting, but some stuff here, i've sort of learned or picked up and maybe thought about a bit. for example, i really like the mid bead on my goto gun, and miss it on my 870. and some of the lead stuff as well.

but many of the other points, i just never thought of or considered.

if you do the thing at ccsc, please drop a line. it would be interesting to learn more from a professional.
If your 870 has a vent rib barrel, installation of a mid point bead would only take a gunsmith 1/2 an hour or less, and shouldn't cost you more than about $40 total.

All that is involved is drilling a centered hole on the rib at the mid point, tapping it for the thread on the bead you select (unless you select one of the tapered post beads, then the hole gets reamed to a matching taper, no threads) and installing the bead (either style) with some heavy duty Loc Tite®

If we put together a NVS day at the shotgun range, I'll make sure it gets posted here.

Geo, you've been wanting to learn to shoot a shotgun, and you're good at organizing things, want to take a crack at it?
 

Kinoons

Obsessed Member
Forum Supporter
#7
And this was the abbreviated, Reader's Digest Condensed version.........the internet would have ground to a halt if I put all the info on this subject here :001_tt2::lkick:.

In actuality, even if I put everything I have ever learned about this subject down here for you all to read, it wouldn't do as much good as a couple of hours at the range and a 100 birds fired at on the skeet field, or out on the sporting clays course.

This is just to get someone started until they can spend some time shooting with someone who knows how to do it AND who can teach it to others.

One of these days with this nice weather we are having we should put together a Nevada Shooters Day at the Clark County shotgun park, group lessons session.
Barring a work thing that I couldn't get out of I'd totally be down for a NS day at CCSP.
 

pick_six

Adjusting to the west!
#9
Nyeco,

if you could provide a bit more info on selecting proper LOP and things on the backend of the gun, that would be very nice. i shoot a basic hunting rig, but have seen the real fancy setups.

if seen the things that help adjust cheek weld and lop as well.

thanks!!!

If your 870 has a vent rib barrel, installation of a mid point bead would only take a gunsmith 1/2 an hour or less, and shouldn't cost you more than about $40 total.

All that is involved is drilling a centered hole on the rib at the mid point, tapping it for the thread on the bead you select (unless you select one of the tapered post beads, then the hole gets reamed to a matching taper, no threads) and installing the bead (either style) with some heavy duty Loc Tite®

If we put together a NVS day at the shotgun range, I'll make sure it gets posted here.

Geo, you've been wanting to learn to shoot a shotgun, and you're good at organizing things, want to take a crack at it?
 

lawsandguns

uber Member
Forum Supporter
#11
If you have any interest in meeting up with a small group to check out fit, make recommendations, and teach a couple of lessons, I would be very interested.
 

NYECOGunsmith

Obsessed Member
Staff member
Moderator
#12
We can do that ^,,, just have to find a day when folks can make it. The range is open Wednesday through Sunday, and I would suggest we start out on the skeet field.

The reason I say that is, it's the easiest way to start becoming a good wing shot in my opinion.

Skeet offers a variety of angles, distances and leads to be learned, but the birds come from the same place at the same speed time after time, so it takes some of the guess work out of it. No matter what station you are on, you always know where the bird will come from.

Once you master those angles and get a hand on determining lead, then moving on to Sporting Clays is the next step to becoming an overall wing shot.

It will teach you to judge lead, angle, distance, speed of the target, and how the terrain and wind and sun affect all those things.

It's the best tune up or learning experience I know of for learning to hit real game birds with consistency.

So, being retired, most any of the 5 days they are open will work for me, with a little advance notice to make sure I don't have some other appointment on that day.

Oh, and not too early in the day, I've got a 90 mile drive to get there, takes me close to 2 hours.

I'm up early, but leaving early enough to get to the range early will disturb my wife's sleep, and with the cancer, she needs as much good rest as she can get.

I can be there easy enough by 10 AM, getting there when it opens at 7 AM puts too much of a strain on her, as I have to leave home about 2 hours before I want to be there, and means I have to get up too early for her to get sufficient rest.
 

pick_six

Adjusting to the west!
#13
I would vote weekend, but I am a lucky one that works regular hours in this town.

Thursdays evenings have reduced rates. But some may be effected by artificial lights vs natural.

We can do that ^,,, just have to find a day when folks can make it. The range is open Wednesday through Sunday, and I would suggest we start out on the skeet field.

The reason I say that is, it's the easiest way to start becoming a good wing shot in my opinion.

Skeet offers a variety of angles, distances and leads to be learned, but the birds come from the same place at the same speed time after time, so it takes some of the guess work out of it. No matter what station you are on, you always know where the bird will come from.

Once you master those angles and get a hand on determining lead, then moving on to Sporting Clays is the next step to becoming an overall wing shot.

It will teach you to judge lead, angle, distance, speed of the target, and how the terrain and wind and sun affect all those things.

It's the best tune up or learning experience I know of for learning to hit real game birds with consistency.

So, being retired, most any of the 5 days they are open will work for me, with a little advance notice to make sure I don't have some other appointment on that day.

Oh, and not too early in the day, I've got a 90 mile drive to get there, takes me close to 2 hours.

I'm up early, but leaving early enough to get to the range early will disturb my wife's sleep, and with the cancer, she needs as much good rest as she can get.

I can be there easy enough by 10 AM, getting there when it opens at 7 AM puts too much of a strain on her, as I have to leave home about 2 hours before I want to be there, and means I have to get up too early for her to get sufficient rest.
 

NYECOGunsmith

Obsessed Member
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#14
I would vote weekend, but I am a lucky one that works regular hours in this town.

Thursdays evenings have reduced rates. But some may be effected by artificial lights vs natural.
They close at 7 PM on Thursdays this time of year. The Late Thursdays (open till 10 PM) ended with the last Thursday in October.

All day Thursday is cheap skeet day, only $4.50 per round, versus $6.50 the other days they are open.

And learning to shoot under the lights makes it more difficult for some, easier for others.

Depends on how much difficulty you have picking the bird up against the background , some find it easier to do at night when you can't see so far beyond the field.
 

NYECOGunsmith

Obsessed Member
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Moderator
#16
The range is currently operating on its winter hours, so they are open :

WINTER HOURS: November 1 through February 28
Wednesday, 8am - 10pm
Thursday - Sunday, 8am - 5pm

Closed on Mondays and Tuesdays.

The only night they are open for shooting under the lights is Wednesdays.

If you are a new wing shooter, it's probably a better idea to learn the basics in daylight when you can see the bird a bit more clearly.
 

Dusty

Obsessed Member
Forum Supporter
#17
I just ordered one of these for My Wife's Christmas Present. She loves shooting but can't use the hand thrower. So I have to throw my own, witch is fine but it get's old after a while. On sale at Amazon for $295.

 

geo

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Moderator
#18
Geo, you've been wanting to learn to shoot a shotgun, and you're good at organizing things, want to take a crack at it?
I would be up for that, just has to wait till January is over.. then perhaps we can set a date to do this. It wont be a Nevada Shooters sanctioned event, as a while back we decided our insurance would not cover injury, but just a bunch of people wanting to learn and meeting up would be great. I will keep it in mind. Oh and BTW thanks for all that info.. just finished reading it all :)
 

NYECOGunsmith

Obsessed Member
Staff member
Moderator
#19
I just ordered one of these for My Wife's Christmas Present. She loves shooting but can't use the hand thrower. So I have to throw my own, witch is fine but it get's old after a while. On sale at Amazon for $295.

Now that's what I call a great Christmas present!

If you and the Missus want lessons, a trip to Bell Vista / Rambo Range with her new toy could be arranged............beats the trap I have that plugs into the trailer hitch socket on my HUMMER and has to be manually cocked for each throw.
 

Dusty

Obsessed Member
Forum Supporter
#20
Now that's what I call a great Christmas present!

If you and the Missus want lessons, a trip to Bell Vista / Rambo Range with her new toy could be arranged............beats the trap I have that plugs into the trailer hitch socket on my HUMMER and has to be manually cocked for each throw.
That sounds great Steve. If you have the time, after Christmas of course. Thanks for your offer. I consider Myself a decent shooter but I'm sure I have plenty to learn from a grand master such as yourself.