What kind of arrows do you shoot?

JR3

living in Henderson NV
#2
I'm just starting to get back into target archery.

When I shot a compound I used store bought aluminum Easton XX75 2117 Game Getter arrows. Plastic vanes. 100 gr field points

Still have some arrows. I'll start with them with my 33# recurve.
 

Dusty

Obsessed Member
Forum Supporter
#3
I just buy the cheapest carbon arrows on the shelf at bass pro. I have had great luck for Me and my Kids. Plastic fletching. I just buy the arrow that matches my draw length and pull. The diagram on the back of the box helps, or just ask someone behind the counter. They will trim and glue them for You. Or I go to Impact Archery, on Dean Marten. Local Mom and Pop type shop.
 

icode

Obsessed Member
#4
I've got some Beman carbon arrows and they have (what looks like) 2" vanes. I've seen other arrows with longer vanes, up to 5" I think. Is there a benefit to the bigger/longer vanes?
 

Dusty

Obsessed Member
Forum Supporter
#5
I think it's preference, but not positive. I have 2 in fletching on my arrows. I shot good groups. Sorry I can't be of more help to you.

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk
 
#10
I use the Sportsmans Warehouse- Vital Impact 340's. Trimmed for my DL. I remove the factory fletching. I add my own reflective wrap and put on 2" Blazers in bright Green and Orange.

It was good enough for my antelope last year at 60 yards.
 

icode

Obsessed Member
#11
I use the Sportsmans Warehouse- Vital Impact 340's. Trimmed for my DL. I remove the factory fletching. I add my own reflective wrap and put on 2" Blazers in bright Green and Orange.

It was good enough for my antelope last year at 60 yards.
Very cool. Why don't you purchase just the shafts so that you don't have to remove the factory fletching? Wouldn't that save you time and money? Also, what steps do you take to remove the fletching?
 
Last edited:
#12
Very cool. Why don't you purchase just the shafts so that you don't have to remove the factory fletching? Wouldn't that save you time and money? Also, what steps do you take to remove the fletching?
With a little bit of work, I can make these cheap arrows have the same specs as very expensive arrows.

I carefully cut off the factory fletching with a razor, also removing any remaining glue.

Out of the box these arrows have .002-.005" of total runout.

I'll put them in my arrow spinner and measure in several places with my dial indicator where the most runout is occuring.

Then I'll cut my arrows to length removing the end with the most runout (that's why I can't leave the fletching on). I can usually get these down to .002" or less in every batch.

I'll square up the ends and check for consistent weight.

Lastly, I'll add my reflective wrap and fletching.

Wraps are easy to remove if you fletching gets jacked up from a pass through a target, or hopefully an animal.
 

icode

Obsessed Member
#14
With a little bit of work, I can make these cheap arrows have the same specs as very expensive arrows.

I carefully cut off the factory fletching with a razor, also removing any remaining glue.

Out of the box these arrows have .002-.005" of total runout.

I'll put them in my arrow spinner and measure in several places with my dial indicator where the most runout is occuring.

Then I'll cut my arrows to length removing the end with the most runout (that's why I can't leave the fletching on). I can usually get these down to .002" or less in every batch.

I'll square up the ends and check for consistent weight.

Lastly, I'll add my reflective wrap and fletching.

Wraps are easy to remove if you fletching gets jacked up from a pass through a target, or hopefully an animal.
Thanks man, that's exactly the kind of info I was hoping for!
 

Ron_O

Cave Dweller
#17
Back in the days when I was shooting and bowhunting a lot, I used the Easton metal shafts but we didn't use (or have available?) solid plastic fletchings. They were imitation feathers and that seemed like a good structure. Seems like if the solid plastic ones bent due to heat or impact they'd make the arrows err in flight under some conditions.

But one thing I noted was that when lofting arrows at game in the field with hunting broadheads, they seemed to float more than the field tips I practiced with. The broadheads seemed to act as wings on the front of the arrow. I began practicing with blunt practice broadheads for just that reason, though they can be tough to remove from targets.
 
#18
My hunting arrow is as follows:

Brand: Beman
Model: Defender Elite (9.3 GPI)
Length: 29" (carbon to carbon)
Spine: 300
Fletching: Blazer Vane
Insert: 75 grain brass
Broadhead: Swhacker (for practice, I use a plain-jane 100 grain field tip)
Total arrow weight: 480 grains

I love a heavy arrow with a decently high FOC. It shoots accurately for me and bucks the wind very well. I'm thinking of switching to a micro-diameter arrow (4mm), but perhaps I should just leave well enough alone and not try to fix things that ain't broke. :)