WHat to check on used revolver

gixxer760

Domestic Terrorist aka pa
Forum Supporter
#1
So i wanted a 629 but hated the idea of the lock so i found a 629-2 (seems it was made in 88) without hte lock. I bought it on gunbroker and it was supposedly barely used but still want to do some safety checks.

I know i need to check the cylinder gap and make sure it has a solid lockup but what else should i check on it?
 

RFSALES

uber Member
#2
Look over out side for finish issues
Look at side plate screws to see if buggered up
Run fingers over barrel to check for bulge
Inspect each charge hole of cylinder
Shine light in bore check for rust and see if land and grooves look strong
Hold gun between palms look at front sight to see if is straight
Check rear sight to be sure straight and not bent or dinged up
Take grips off look for rust
Pull hammer back to single action position then hold gun with thumb on hammer spur and squeeze gently to check for push off
Pull hammer back slowly to be sure gun locks up on cylinder stop. After each pull touch cylinder charge hole to see if any movement.

Did you get a 3 day non firing inspection agreement with the gun ?
 

gixxer760

Domestic Terrorist aka pa
Forum Supporter
#3
Look over out side for finish issues
Look at side plate screws to see if buggered up
Run fingers over barrel to check for bulge
Inspect each charge hole of cylinder
Shine light in bore check for rust and see if land and grooves look strong
Hold gun between palms look at front sight to see if is straight
Check rear sight to be sure straight and not bent or dinged up
Take grips off look for rust
Pull hammer back to single action position then hold gun with thumb on hammer spur and squeeze gently to check for push off
Pull hammer back slowly to be sure gun locks up on cylinder stop. After each pull touch cylinder charge hole to see if any movement.

Did you get a 3 day non firing inspection agreement with the gun ?
No was my first online gun purchase. Looking at the pics the screws all look on good shape but I'll definitely give it a good once over before doing anything. If it seems out of whack I'll pay the in shop gunsmith to take a look before leaving the store.
 

Gullwing

1911 pistolsmith
Staff member
Moderator
#4
No was my first online gun purchase. Looking at the pics the screws all look on good shape but I'll definitely give it a good once over before doing anything. If it seems out of whack I'll pay the in shop gunsmith to take a look before leaving the store.
For things like that you should ask that old guy on here about it, gosh what is his name? That really really old guy who knows EVERYTHING?? I think it starts with a NYE and ends in smith. But I could be mistaken.
 

gixxer760

Domestic Terrorist aka pa
Forum Supporter
#5
For things like that you should ask that old guy on here about it, gosh what is his name? That really really old guy who knows EVERYTHING?? I think it starts with a NYE and ends in smith. But I could be mistaken.
Lol I'm sure he will chime in. I know there are a few revolver enthusiasts on the board who can help. And maybe the next guy who wants to buy a revolver will know how to look the part when inspecting it hahaj
 
#6
I would check the date that 629 was built S&W has a lifetime service policy for guns made in 1989 and after. It is supposed to be for original owner but they have know way of verifying the original owner. If there is a problem they will fix it including shipping both ways.

More than likely there will be no issues. Congrats nice pickup.
 

NYECOGunsmith

Obsessed Member
Staff member
Moderator
#7
In addition to all the things mentioned above, check the crown for dings, inspect the ratchet palls for wear, check the cylinder for end shake, check the crane/yoke to make sure it isn't bent, check the forcing cone for wear, cracks and an uneven chamfer, check the underside of the frame above the forcing cone for flame cutting, check the carry up of the cylinder for all six chambers, check the face of the cylinder hand for wear, cracks or chips, check the cylinder stop for wear and proper lock up timing, check the drag line around the cylinder if there, it should be light and even, check the firing pin bushing for wear, cracks and flame cutting, check the nose of the firing pin for damage, check the alignment of each chamber to the barrel and firing pin hole with a range rod, check the single action and double action sears (with the grips and side plate off) for cracks, wear, chips, or signs of some monkey forking with them to try and "improve" the trigger pull. Check the hammer side play, check the frame at the hammer slot for wear or damage. Check the edges of the side plate for signs some idiot pried them off.

That's about it off the top of my pointy head.

Or, bake another Grandma's Texas pecan pie and bring it and the gun to me and I will check it out for you. The gun that is, the pie is my fee for checking it out.

And the middle name, GW, is COGun !
 
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#8
In addition to all the things mentioned above, check the crown for dings, inspect the ratchet palls for wear, check the cylinder for end shake, check the crane/yoke to make sure it isn't bent, check the forcing cone for wear, cracks and an uneven chamfer, check the underside of the frame above the forcing cone for flame cutting, check the carry up of the cylinder for all six chambers, check the face of the cylinder hand for wear, cracks or chips, check the cylinder stop for wear and proper lock up timing, check the drag line around the cylinder if there, it should be light and even, check the firing pin bushing for wear, cracks and flame cutting, check the nose of the firing pin for damage, check the alignment of each chamber to the barrel and firing pin hole with a range rod, check the single action and double action sears (with the grips and side plate off) for cracks, wear, chips, or signs of some monkey forking with them to try and "improve" the trigger pull. Check the hammer side play, check the frame at the hammer slot for wear or damage. Check the edges of the side plate for signs some idiot pried them off.

That's about it off the top of my pointy head.

Or, bake another Grandma's Texas pecan pie and bring it and the gun to me and I will check it out for you. The gun that is, the pie is my fee for checking it out.

And the middle name, GW, is COGun !
That's It? I don't think I would be letting anyone turn a screw on any of my sideplates unless we were at his FFL licensed shop ( of course NYECOGunsmith would be the exception as a retired smith) Easiest thing to do to devalue a Smith revolver is to booger a screw.
 

NYECOGunsmith

Obsessed Member
Staff member
Moderator
#9
That's It? I don't think I would be letting anyone turn a screw on any of my sideplates unless we were at his FFL licensed shop ( of course NYECOGunsmith would be the exception as a retired smith) Easiest thing to do to devalue a Smith revolver is to booger a screw.
Or booger up the side plate by prying it off.

Remove the screw(s), using a properly fitted hollow ground screw driver bit (and even then, I generally put a layer or two of blue masking tape all around each screw head, anyone can slip, why take a chance scratching the finish?) turn it over so the side plate is down and give the left side a good smack with the heel of your hand, may take a few raps, sometimes you even have to resort to a mallet with a leather face on it, but the momentum imparted will eventually pop the side plate off without damaging it.

I guarantee that prying it will damage it.

Oh, and watch the edges of the side plate once it is off, they are quite literally razor sharp, really easy to get a nasty cut from them.
 

gixxer760

Domestic Terrorist aka pa
Forum Supporter
#10
In addition to all the things mentioned above, check the crown for dings, inspect the ratchet palls for wear, check the cylinder for end shake, check the crane/yoke to make sure it isn't bent, check the forcing cone for wear, cracks and an uneven chamfer, check the underside of the frame above the forcing cone for flame cutting, check the carry up of the cylinder for all six chambers, check the face of the cylinder hand for wear, cracks or chips, check the cylinder stop for wear and proper lock up timing, check the drag line around the cylinder if there, it should be light and even, check the firing pin bushing for wear, cracks and flame cutting, check the nose of the firing pin for damage, check the alignment of each chamber to the barrel and firing pin hole with a range rod, check the single action and double action sears (with the grips and side plate off) for cracks, wear, chips, or signs of some monkey forking with them to try and "improve" the trigger pull. Check the hammer side play, check the frame at the hammer slot for wear or damage. Check the edges of the side plate for signs some idiot pried them off.

That's about it off the top of my pointy head.

Or, bake another Grandma's Texas pecan pie and bring it and the gun to me and I will check it out for you. The gun that is, the pie is my fee for checking it out.

And the middle name, GW, is COGun !
I wish I could take you up on that offer, ill only be in Vegas for 3 days packing, already took a new job. Leave the 26th of march for Charlotte (they decided no AL for me) to train then im off to map ANG base networks, work with the network engineer to build the configs then replacing all layer 2 and 3 hardware on 30 different bases. Im scrambling cause ill be living out of a suicase for the next year and a half lol


I did watch larry potterfield clean a 629 and noticed he used sharp hits on the grip opposite side with a non marring hammer to remove the side plate.