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CMP 1911







Kinoons

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#1
Anyone else send in a order for this last batch of 1911s from the CMP? I got my Rando number and it looks like I may just barely squeak in getting one. Maybe.
 

MAC702

LEGEN...wait for it... DARY!
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#2
I just ran out of time. But I console myself that I had no chance anyway, and then I rationalize that since I already have one, I should let someone else have my chance at one of these.
 

tdyoung58

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#3
I haven't felt the need to try to buy a CMP 1911. LGS here has 3 pre WW2 guns for sale. All original, a bit pricey.
 

ev780

New member
#4
This is going to sound snarky but it really truly is just ignorance.

I don't get it with the CMP 1911 program. A thousand bucks for an unknown quality pistol. (I know it says Service Grade but my point is valid.) Shooter grade 1911's are a dime a dozen, so what is the "it" factor that I am obviously missing? There has to be something triggering collectors and I am totally missing it.
 

MAC702

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#5
When you say "shooter grade 1911s," are you referring to military contractor-made and government-issued 1911A1s from US inventory that served in WW2, e.g.? You aren't seeing these for 'a dime a dozen!"

Indeed, this is all about the collector value. A $400 Armscor is going to be a far better shooting pistol.
 
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#6
When you say "shooter grade 1911s," are you referring to military contractor-made and government-issued 1911A1s from US inventory that served in WW2, e.g.? You aren't seeing these for 'a dime a dozen!"

Indeed, this is all about the collector value. A $400 Armscor is going to be a far better shooting pistol.
Right now I would say the going rate for an average WWII 1911A1 arsenal rebuild mixmaster is an easy $1000.00 to $1200.00 and a whole lot more if a US&S slide or frame is involved.
 

ev780

New member
#8
When you say "shooter grade 1911s," are you referring to military contractor-made and government-issued 1911A1s from US inventory that served in WW2, e.g.? You aren't seeing these for 'a dime a dozen!"

Indeed, this is all about the collector value. A $400 Armscor is going to be a far better shooting pistol.
I meant a gun you can shoot. Are these not that? I couldn't really tell when I first researched them if they were just modern excess inventory or new old stock or actually issued guns with a provenance.

Right now I would say the going rate for an average WWII 1911A1 arsenal rebuild mixmaster is an easy $1000.00 to $1200.00 and a whole lot more if a US&S slide or frame is involved.
So I am starting to see that it is collector value. I assume these have Certificates Of Authenticity by the CMP and all that. That makes more sense now.
 

Kinoons

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#9
Yup - so they’re all US military surplus m1911s. Potentially from WWI or WWII - likely rearsenaled multiple times. Cool to have from a collector aspect.
 
#10
I meant a gun you can shoot. Are these not that? I couldn't really tell when I first researched them if they were just modern excess inventory or new old stock or actually issued guns with a provenance.
In a nut shell - The last major military contract to purchase to 1911A1-s ended in 1945 with the military buying a small amount of modern 1911A1-s here and there for specialty use probably starting in the 80s. All the ones offered by the CMP are mostly WWII era units rebuilt by several arsenals several times over the years and used thru Viet Nam and possibly up to the first Gulf War. Most of the pre-Korea rebuilds used parts from the original manufactures of WWII (Colt, Ithaca, Remington Rand and to a lesser degree United Switch and Signal who only manufactured 55000 units). After Korea, the military contracted other manufactures (Smith and Wesson for instance) for replacement parts. During the rebuild process, all the "within spec" like parts from all the manufactures were just mixed together and randomly selected to reassemble the pistol - hence the term "mixmaster". A 1911A1 intact with all its original parts and finish are out there but they are pricey. For example, Remington Rand made the most 1911A1-s of all the manufactures and a NOS unit in the original shipping box will be a easy $5000.00+ pistol. A few months ago I bellied up to the bar for a real nice Union Switch and Signal unit and I will be eating pork and beans till next Christmas. Getting the hang of all the manufactures and all their specific parts and particularities takes time but not near as bad as M1 Carbines. Once the military 1911 and 1911A1 bug bites you in the butt.....well.....I don't know what to say. Don't get me going on a Singer.
 
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