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New rifle and first scope mount






#1
OK, i got anxious after i bought my new rifle that they wouldn't be able to mount my scope for 3 days!!! So, bam bought a bunch of new stuff and here I am.
I got the Browning X-Bolt hells canyon in 6.5 PRC, Leupold cross rail mount and rings.
I have been researching it a bit for a few days but didn't get serious until today when i decided to do the work myself. I trust most of the guys here 10000 times more than i trust the random google search results....
So first question - is, sure i can level everything like the table, but i only have a sled (rifle strapped to the sled) not a vice so how can i make sure the rifle itself is actually level? There is no flat surface on the top its all rounded. Is it safe to use the rail top after i torque it down?
2nd question - is do i put oil on the mount screws?? i cant imagine this is a good idea since they have locktite on them.
3rd question - I was told by an armorer that lapping the rings was unnecessary, since the machining process has changes so much the past 30 years. This is brand new gear and should be no problem. Hes been mounting scope for years and said he has only had to lap 2 ever and one was ancient and the other was on a rifle with a $8000 barrel.
any other tips would be appreciated, lots of literature and vids on this but because of the uniqueness of this footprint and the x-bolt in such a new round that is technically a LA, but working in a SA rifle. I figured id just get some input from you guys

Thanks
 

Fogie

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#2
Putting a level on the rail is more than I do, which is push it as far forward as eye relief allows, shoulder the gun and it looks right...but I am a hunter, not a long range dude.
No oil on screws, just a tiny bit of Loctite..
Should be no need to lap...
 
#3
Where are you located?
1 yes you can use the scope rail to level depending on the rail
2 No oil use proper torque. If you don’t have an inch pound driver find one.
3. Lapping maybe it’s not just the rings that can be a problem. The rail, the scope, the rifle action can determine if the rings should be lapped. If they do it only takes a few min with the proper lapping tools.
 

Saber6

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#4
Once your scope mount is secured to the action I wouldn't see any issue with you using that as a level surface. I mount my optics with that method.
I mount the rail. Put a level on the rail, and make sure the weapon is level. Mount the optic. I hang a plumb bob about 15/20yrds away and line up the scopes reticle with that. Then I'll add a scope mounted level so that I can assure the optic is level when dialing in at extended ranges.
I would think the oil would not be good for keeping the screws secure.
I've never lapped a scope mount, so no experience on if its worth it
 

MAC702

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#5
I don't level anything. I use a short rigid steel ruler in between and perpendicular to the scope and rail, and angle it so that the edges flatly touch both the top of the rail and the bottom of the scope's saddle at the same time. That makes the scope and rail parallel to each other, regardless of whether the rifle is level or not.
 
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#6
Where are you located?
1 yes you can use the scope rail to level depending on the rail
2 No oil use proper torque. If you don’t have an inch pound driver find one.
3. Lapping maybe it’s not just the rings that can be a problem. The rail, the scope, the rifle action can determine if the rings should be lapped. If they do it only takes a few min with the proper lapping tools.
Im in Las Vegas
i do have a torque wrench and got the base torqued on to almost about 20 in/lbs
I dont have the lapping kit, but i havent put the mount on yet.
thank you

Once your scope mount is secured to the action I wouldn't see any issue with you using that as a level surface. I mount my optics with that method.
I mount the rail. Put a level on the rail, and make sure the weapon is level. Mount the optic. I hang a plumb bob about 15/20yrds away and line up the scopes reticle with that. Then I'll add a scope mounted level so that I can assure the optic is level when dialing in at extended ranges.
I would think the oil would not be good for keeping the screws secure.
I've never lapped a scope mount, so no experience on if its worth it
so when i did that the weirdest thing the scop ring bases were not level but the rail was???
I bought the scope level kit im trying to figure that out now, i got the level right pro by real avid
Thank you

I don't level anything. I use a steel ruler and angle it so that it flatly touches both the top of the rail and the bottom of the scope's saddle at the same time. That makes the scope and rail parallel to each other, regardless of whether the rifle is level or not.
How would i adjust with this method? I mean if its not level

At this point im really considering Fogie's idea, shoulder this bad boy and go put some rounds on paper tomorrow!!!!
Im just worried that if i have to shoot from a new position thats when ill see a problem and think its me but its the gun... Im a hunter too but wouldnt mind creeping out my ethical kill zone little by little.
 

Fogie

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#7
Im in Las Vegas
i do have a torque wrench and got the base torqued on to almost about 20 in/lbs
I dont have the lapping kit, but i havent put the mount on yet.
thank you



so when i did that the weirdest thing the scop ring bases were not level but the rail was???
I bought the scope level kit im trying to figure that out now, i got the level right pro by real avid
Thank you



How would i adjust with this method? I mean if its not level

At this point im really considering Fogie's idea, shoulder this bad boy and go put some rounds on paper tomorrow!!!!
Im just worried that if i have to shoot from a new position thats when ill see a problem and think its me but its the gun... Im a hunter too but wouldnt mind creeping out my ethical kill zone little by little.
the point to all of this is to make the vertical line in the crosshair line up with the vertical centerline of the rifle, so that when you shoulder the gun the crosshairs are "straight" and not cocked to some degree. Have always eyeballed it and it works out fine and the bore sighter confirms. If it is cocked at all, the problem would show when cranking tactical turrets a bunch or holding very high at long distances.
If you are going to use my dubious method of shouldering the gun repeatedly and looking for misalignment, it works for me but there are better yet more entailed and precise ways to do it.
 
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#8
Im in Las Vegas
i do have a torque wrench and got the base torqued on to almost about 20 in/lbs
I dont have the lapping kit, but i havent put the mount on yet.
thank you.
I build custom bolt rifles for police and civilians if you need any help mounting your scope I’m in old Henderson.

Leveling the crossfire is not always best. The reticle can be off a few degrees, and most are. Leveling the reticle can cause tracking issues if you are a knob turner and shoot long range. The further the distance the more you will see it. If you shoot long range and turn knobs you are better off leveling the scope saddle and turret. If you shoot using hold over or use your reticle for ranging and windage you can level the reticle.

if you are seeing leveling issues between base and rings this may be one reason to check alignment and possibly lapping
Stacking tolerances can be a (b****).
 

MAC702

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#9
...How would i adjust with this method? I mean if its not level...
I snug the ring screws just enough so that I can turn the scope inside the rings but it will stay where I put it. That lets me turn it until the bottom of the saddle is parallel to the top of the rail.

And like Fogie says, I push the scope as far forward as eye relief lets me. Use the highest power when adjusting eye relief.
 
#10
I finished it..... i couldn't tell inside the house but at the range i could definitely tell it wasn't level. Tried to level the gun then the scope and fine tune by flashing a flashlight backwards through the scope to make sure the reticle was straight. The level right pro, was trash it didn't work even after charging it. Good tip from @HateCA to not dial just hold over until it's perfect. At least i got my barrel broke in, now I'm going to adjust the scope a bit see if i can get it perfect.
 

tdyoung58

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#13
I use the two level Wheeler Engineering kit.

Basically you put a magnetic level on the rail and another on the turrent (w/o the cap).
For aluminum receivers I use a strip of double sided tape.

Weaver makes one as well.