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Set Back in Blazer 9mm Brass







vortex0178

Pew Pew Grand Master
#1
I've noticed over the last year or so that my reloads are more prone to set back (bullet getting pushed into the case). I reset my dies yesterday and even with minimal belling and no crimp, I was still able to push the bullet (RMR 124gr FMJ) into the case with little effort.

Over the last year I had also started using Blazer brass exclusively rather than loading mixed, so when I tried a handful of mixed brass, sure enough it was not possible to push in the heads by hand. I'm guessing the ID of Blazer cases is a bit larger than most other brass, so even after resizing, the bullets are slightly looser in the case and more prone to set back issues. This makes sense to me intuitively as Blazer also seems to burn a little cleaner than other 9mm; maybe the thin case walls fire form more easily to the chamber, resulting in a better seal for gases around the case mouth.

Anyway a heads up just in case (haha) you run into a similar problem. Pity that my shiny polished Blazer brass will now end up in my scrap brass pile.
 
#2
I haven’t noticed that with blazer brass & I reload a lot of it , why not just run it thru the crimp die & keep on using them ? I’ve been using Lee dies & no problems YET with plated or fmj’s .
 

MAC702

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#3
Plated bullets seem to be much more susceptible to this. All of my bullet tension problems went away when I switched back to lead or jacketed. That said, I run exclusively mixed brass with no discrimination whatsoever. I know I see Blazer headstamps, along with everything else out there. My go-to bullet right now is also the RMR 124 FMJ. I'm using Dillon dies in every location of the Dillon XL650 for 9mm.

In .45, all of my bullet tension problems disappeared when I changed out the Dillon crimp die for the Lee Factory Crimp die.
 

totenschadel

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#4
I've came across both pistol and rifle brass that seems to have limited ductility and therefore does not properly reform when resizing. If my memory serves none of it was domestic brass though. If annealing was an option I'll bet that Blazer brass could be fixed.
 

Aswild

Ez come ez go
#5
Plated bullets seem to be much more susceptible to this. All of my bullet tension problems went away when I switched back to lead or jacketed. That said, I run exclusively mixed brass with no discrimination whatsoever. I know I see Blazer headstamps, along with everything else out there. My go-to bullet right now is also the RMR 124 FMJ. I'm using Dillon dies in every location of the Dillon XL650 for 9mm.

In .45, all of my bullet tension problems disappeared when I changed out the Dillon crimp die for the Lee Factory Crimp die.
Mac I have some emergency 9 mm jhp that are all silver and super light. Who makes the rmr? I read gecko I think but compared to other jhp I have they are so light.

8A3FADE9-AA6E-4ADC-9159-D2361B7DCD7A.jpeg
 

vortex0178

Pew Pew Grand Master
#6
I haven’t noticed that with blazer brass & I reload a lot of it , why not just run it thru the crimp die & keep on using them ? I’ve been using Lee dies & no problems YET with plated or fmj’s .
Crimping doesn't seem to solve the problem for me. If I crimp too hard the bullet will spin in the case. If I crimp just enough to remove the bell, you can still push the bullet in.

Maybe my carbide sizing die is just worn out and needs to be replaced. But in the mean time I'll load using mixed brass and see if the problem persists.
 

moar different

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#7
lee factory crimp die. try another sizing die . oal too long hitting rifling .. load to minimum length ... powder coat the bullets to fatten them up ...

either the case is too expanded or the bullets are skinny ... what do they measure ?
 
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totenschadel

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#8
Crimping doesn't seem to solve the problem for me. If I crimp too hard the bullet will spin in the case. If I crimp just enough to remove the bell, you can still push the bullet in.

Maybe my carbide sizing die is just worn out and needs to be replaced. But in the mean time I'll load using mixed brass and see if the problem persists.
Clear indication your brass is springing back from the resizing process, it's been work hardened.
 

totenschadel

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#11
all of them ? he would be getting some split necks if that were the case.
It actually makes more sense if it's same or similar lot. Used about the same number of times, the metallurgical properties are similar. He also stated "even with minimal belling and no crimp...." so he may not be seeing split necks yet. When the OP introduced mixed brass to (assuming the same die setup) the problem no longer exists. Anneal that brass and the problem goes away.
 

Bumper

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#13
Might be a good idea to have some digital calipers. That way you can compare case wall thickness, ID, OD etc.
 

totenschadel

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#14
I guess if it was as hard to find better brass like finding primers it would justify trying to anneal pistol brass but .....F that 🤣
True, but for sh*ts and giggles, a map torch and a pan of water could get em close enough to see that it's a ductility issue with the sub-par materials Blazer brass uses. No way would I expend that time and money annealing hundreds of 9mm casings for sake of being a stingy bastard.
 

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#15
I guess if it was as hard to find better brass like finding primers it would justify trying to anneal pistol brass but .....F that 🤣
Make sure you also clean, uniform, and deburr the primer pockets and flash holes while you're at it! o_O
 

gixxer760

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#17

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#18
Make absolutely certain that lightweight hyper-velocity stuff functions in your pistol if you decide to buy into the hype about its performance. If you aren't willing to shoot 200 rounds of it to make sure, you probably shouldn't be carrying it.
 

vortex0178

Pew Pew Grand Master
#19
Update: So far the only setback issues I've found since loading mixed headstamp has been with Speer brass, which is presumably similar to Blazer. So I really think this has to do more with CCI's brass as opposed to overworking it as I hadn't reloaded any Speer headstamped brass.
 
#20
It is real simple--expand the case and measure the case ID beyond any case mouth flare. The case ID should be 0.001-0.002" smaller than actual bullet diameter. Any smaller, and seating is more difficult and crooked bullet seating is a real possibility. Any larger, and you can't get case tension to hold the bullet.
After seating, pull a bullet a verify that the bullet diameter is unchanged.
Taper crimp will not hold the bullet--you need case tension.
I find that of all cartridges I reload, 9mm Luger cases have the widest range of case wall thicknesses and pushing down on every seated bullet is not just a good idea, but a necessity.