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The Decline of the American Sedan






Ramone

Obsessed Member
#21
You can't compare European, or Asian car markets with ours. They pay significantly more in fuel and taxes than we do, and they have significantly lower percentages of vehicle ownership. Their population densities tend to be greater as well, making parking space a premium. In most of these countries, owning any car, even a small one is usually a luxury, most people go their whole lives never owning a car.
Sometimes I think the socialists want to do the same thing here: Get everyone out of their cars and into public transportation. Yet, the U.S. is a large country that needs its cars, trucks, and highways to move the economy. Contrast this situation to what is happening in Russia: Automobile manufacturing is a big deal because it is considered a vital part of economic modernization. Western companies such as Ford, GM, VW, and Renault make cars there now. Hyundai is a bestseller.
 
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turborich

Obsessed Member
#23
Start buying old Ford crown Victoria P71 police interceptors. A genuine body on frame rear wheel drive car with the extremely dependable 4.6 liter V-8, 4R70W automatic transmission, dual exhaust. 1998-2011 models, 2003's and up got rack and pinion steering. Plenty of truck space!
 

SixshooterSam

What, me conspiracy?
#26
2003 Grand Marquis here, just over 100k miles....hoping it lasts another 100k.
It will if you take care of it. My '95 Town Car has 312k and is rock solid. I have many customers, family and such with various Panthers of all years and every one of them was rock solid reliable, well past 200k miles. In my experience, the '91-97 Town Cars are some of the most reliable cars on the planet. Extremely low average maintenance cost over their long lifespan, and they are extremely nice cars to drive. In particular I am fond of '95-97, as you get the updated dash, as well as the far superior 4R70W transmission, as well as superior engine management starting in '95. '95 and early '96 also have the added benefit of an aluminum intake manifold, instead of the later plastic manifold which cracks.

If someone is on a budget and needs a car, I always point them towards a Panther. Always.
 

secretasianman

Very Active Member
Forum Supporter
2019 Supporter
#27
I like SUVs for higher tow capacity and 4WD/AWD. Another advantage is the ability to fold down the rear seats and sleep in the back if you do a one or two person camping trip (of course that'll vary based on size of the SUV). They also have better clearance for dirt roads to go shooting.

And as Bart Carter said, many come with or have available for sale pullout covers to hide your stuff in the back. If a thief is going to smash your windows, getting to the trunk via the rear seat is simple.

Yes it is a shame Ford has abandoned the sedan market. I bought a fuel efficient Subaru Impreza for commuting in the snow because Ford/Chevy never released a proper competitor.
 

flyer338

NRA Patriot Life Member Benefactor
Forum Supporter
2019 Supporter
2020 Supporter
#29
In my opinion the two biggest factors in the reduction in the number of deaths from motor vehicle crashes are anti-lock brakes and airbags. If you are driving a vehicle that leaks either, you are giving up an important safety advantage.
 

SixshooterSam

What, me conspiracy?
#30
In my opinion the two biggest factors in the reduction in the number of deaths from motor vehicle crashes are anti-lock brakes and airbags. If you are driving a vehicle that leaks either, you are giving up an important safety advantage.
I would posit that crash safety has had far more of an impact on survival rates in accidents than driving aids. I don't believe the number of accidents per capita has declined, but the survival rate per accident certainly has dropped. Driving aids give people a false sense of security and tend to make people drive faster and more reckless than is safe for conditions, so when the accident does eventually happen, they're going substantially faster and are more likely to be hurt. We all see it on the road everyday, people driving waaaaay too fast in the rain, snow, etc..

My survival rate driving a bunch of classic cars with drum brakes, no ABS/airbags and bias ply tires is right at 100%, because I pay attention to what others on the road are doing and I drive accordingly. I also make driving the absolute priority when I'm behind the wheel. Unlike all these (a**hole)s on the road who are using their phone or otherwise not paying attention to the task of driving.

I make a terrible passenger in most people's cars because I do not tolerate people making driving a secondary task to some other nonsense, and I will say something about it right away, since it's potentially my life too if they (fack) up.
 
#31
Most people do not know how to use the ABS brakes on their cars and they will still die in a crash, Cops have to be trained to use ABS brakes, I had to teach both my sister and Mother to use ABS to keep from crashing and dying.
 

DeanD

Summerlin
Forum Supporter
2019 Supporter
#32
I am a rear wheel drive sedan guy. Have had a Yukon SUV, it was a really quality made vehicle, Corvettes...old ones were kinda bad quality and old technology but the '07 I had was very well engineered and manufactured. Went to a Mercedes E Class sedan, first one was Bluetec diesel...awesome car I think it went 700 miles to a tank?, next was 3.2 V6 non turbo...awesome car, currently a 2015 CLS 400 twin turbo 3.0 V6 / 7 speed tranny. I won't buy a front wheel drive car, won't buy a Jap car (because of their trade discrimination against the US) but their quality is awesome. I enjoy driving so go for the German sedans. Great engineering, great quality, well made and comfortable and the faster you go the better they feel. Just before the shutdown I was in FL and had a new Chevrolet Impala and have to sat that car was nice, a lot of bang for the buck! When you go from a Mercedes to a Chevy and it still feels good and comfortable to drive you know it is good.
 

flyer338

NRA Patriot Life Member Benefactor
Forum Supporter
2019 Supporter
2020 Supporter
#34
The best way to stay alive on the road is to pay attention. I include in that statement looking as far ahead as one can see and keeping situational awareness for who is around you and what they are doing. That is more important and better protects one better than all of the safety devices ever conceived. The sad truth is that even the best of us make mistakes, and most people never look farther ahead than their front bumper.
 

SixshooterSam

What, me conspiracy?
#35
Most people do not know how to use the ABS brakes on their cars and they will still die in a crash, Cops have to be trained to use ABS brakes, I had to teach both my sister and Mother to use ABS to keep from crashing and dying.
ABS brakes do not have a learning curve, nor require any special training. Now, if all you've ever driven are non-ABS cars and you've developed bad habits with those brakes, you'll need to correct those bad habits, but that's not the same thing.

Most cars have had ABS for quite some time now, so new drivers coming up today may never even drive a car without ABS. All you have to do is press the brake. No special skills or training required.

The best habit to get into with brakes, whether you have ABS or not, is to do all of your braking before turning the steering wheel. That's a lesson you learn fast on the racetrack, but it comes into play on the street just the same, especially on slick surfaces. Braking in a turn is a great way to lose control, ABS or not.